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Native Plants

Featuring American Beauties Native Plants

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL

Verbena 'Homestead Purple'

Verbena

Named by Dr. Alan Armitage, of the University of Georgia. Vigorously spreading, deep purple clusters from June to November. Excellent clean, deep green foliage with a trailing habit. Has been surviving the winter here lately, but it gets a very slow start in the spring. Best treated as an annual zone 6 or less.

Verbena 'Homestead Purple'

Verbena hastata

Blue vervain
The tall thin spikes of Blue Vervain grace the wet meadows of the US in July and August. Verbena hastata is a short-lived perennial that readily self sows where happy. A great plant for pond's edge where it seeds in between sedges and rushes and cheerfully holds its own.
Verbena hastata

Vernonia glauca

Upland ironweed
A native Pennsylvania plant that is happy in ordinary to dry spots. A bit shorter than V. noveboracensis, and much more adaptable to average garden conditions. Deep purple loose upright flower clusters in August and September are attractive to people and butterflies. Help us make it less rare!
Vernonia glauca

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Ironweed

This selection of the Arkansas native comes to us from Dr. Allan Armitage's trials at the University of Georgia. It has lovely fine foliage like Amsonia hubrichtii and is a compact, well-branched and vigorous plant. In late summer it is covered with true purple flowers that attract plenty of butterflies. Found in rocky flood plains, Vernonia lettermannii is very tolerant of hot dry locations, yet can withstand brief periods of inundation.

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Vernonia noveboracensis

New York ironweed
Deep purple haze in damp meadows, roadsides and pastures. A lovely native that adapts well to any moist location.
Vernonia noveboracensis

Veronicastrum virginicum

Culver's root

Big dramatic spikes of white Veronica-like flowers in July and August. Very tough and long-lasting once established. Found in open woods, moist meadows, and praries east of the Rockies.

Veronicastrum virginicum

Veronicastrum virginicum 'Lavender Towers'

Culver's root
This Pagels introduction is outstanding! A regal plant that hovers above the border with long spikes of pale purple flowers in mid summer. Whorled foliage provides an interesting foil for early summer bloomers.
Veronicastrum virginicum 'Lavender Towers'

Viola walteri 'Silver Gem'

Prostrate blue violet

From the gardens of Mt. Cuba Center, North Creek is delighted to introduce this tough native groundcover. Easily identified by trailing stems and delicate lavender flowers, 'Silver Gem' forms a dense, tidy mat of attractive silver foliage. Flowers appear in March and persist into autumn. Our plant trials have proven 'Silver Gem' to be exceptionally drought tolerant and happiest in part to full shade. Pot in quarts or gallons for early spring sales.

 

Viola walteri 'Silver Gem'

Woodwardia virginica

Virginia chain fern
Virginia Chain Fern is a great native landscaping fern for those tough areas with moist or saturated soils. Spreading quickly, it provides a dense, weed-resistant groundcover in damp sites or sunny pond edges. It also is beautiful, and less assertive, in average garden conditions.
Woodwardia virginica

Zizia aurea

Golden Alexanders

Golden clusters of 3-4" umbels in May and June. Deep green, leathery, handsomely divided basal foliage. Native to wooded bottomlands, stream banks, moist meadows, and floodplains east of the Rockies. Very attractive to butterflies.

Zizia aurea
Botanical Name     Common Name
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