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Landscape Plugs™

NEW SIZE!  Learn more about the LP50 plug here.

Our best low-maintenance native perennials and grasses are available in plugs designed to be planted directly in the ground. We offer a wide selection of Eastern US natives and their cultivars selected for beauty and durability. Two sizes are available for direct planting: deep LP50 plugs are 5 inches deep by 2 inches square and come 50 to a standard nursery tray. Many shallow-rooted plants are available in flats of 32 (3" by 2.5" square) and are also suited to planting in the ground. Our Landscape Plugs™ offer an exciting alternative for quick establishment of plants in landscapes and containers.

Plant Selection
We are very selective in our choices for the Landscape Plugs™ program so that your planting gets off to a great start. All plants in our plug program are native to the midatlantic states, well suited to this climate and tolerant of drought and extreme temperature fluctuations. Robust root systems make for quick establishment and less initial watering. Plants purchased in spring are vernalized and ready to grow.

Why Use Landscape Plugs™?

  • Plants usually reach flowering size in first season and have a high transplant success rate.
  • Quicker and more reliable than seed, with erosion control starting in weeks rather than months.
  • LP50 plugs have deep (5") roots that establish quickly.
  • Compact size is easy to transport - a real cost saver.
  • Plants are chosen for wide adaptability and ease of transplanting and establishment.
  • Excellent choices for wildlife habitat development, providing food & shelter for many species.
  • Plugs come in flats made of 100% recycled plastic and are #6 recyclable.

Many thanks to the Biota of North America Program (BONAP) for the use of their North American Plant Atlas species distribution maps, which can be found on each native Landscape Plug™ species page. Click the map image to enlarge and view the plant's distribution status by county via link to the BONAP site. All map images are courtesy: Kartesz, J.T., The Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2013. Taxonomic Data Center. (http://www.bonap.net/tdc). Chapel Hill, N.C. [maps generated from Kartesz, J.T. 2013. Floristic Synthesis of North America, Version 1.0. Biota of North America Program (BONAP). (in press)] 

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL

Verbena hastata

Blue vervain
The tall thin spikes of Blue Vervain grace the wet meadows of the US in July and August. Verbena hastata is a short-lived perennial that readily self sows where happy. A great plant for pond's edge where it seeds in between sedges and rushes and cheerfully holds its own.
Verbena hastata

Vernonia glauca

Upland ironweed
A native Pennsylvania plant that is happy in ordinary to dry spots. A bit shorter than V. noveboracensis, and much more adaptable to average garden conditions. Deep purple loose upright flower clusters in August and September are attractive to people and butterflies. Help us make it less rare!
Vernonia glauca

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Ironweed

This selection of the Arkansas native comes to us from Dr. Allan Armitage's trials at the University of Georgia. It has lovely fine foliage like Amsonia hubrichtii and is a compact, well-branched and vigorous plant. In late summer it is covered with true purple flowers that attract plenty of butterflies. Found in rocky flood plains, Vernonia lettermannii is very tolerant of hot dry locations, yet can withstand brief periods of inundation.

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Vernonia noveboracensis

New York ironweed
Deep purple haze in damp meadows, roadsides and pastures. A lovely native that adapts well to any moist location.
Vernonia noveboracensis

Veronicastrum virginicum

Veronicastrum virginicum

Culver's root

Big dramatic spikes of white Veronica-like flowers in July and August. Very tough and long-lasting once established. Found in open woods, moist meadows, and praries east of the Rockies.

Veronicastrum virginicum

Viola walteri 'Silver Gem'

Prostrate blue violet

From the gardens of Mt. Cuba Center, North Creek is delighted to introduce this tough native groundcover. Easily identified by trailing stems and delicate lavender flowers, 'Silver Gem' forms a dense, tidy mat of attractive silver foliage. Flowers appear in March and persist into autumn. Our plant trials have proven 'Silver Gem' to be exceptionally drought tolerant and happiest in part to full shade. Pot in quarts or gallons for early spring sales.

 

Viola walteri 'Silver Gem'

Woodwardia virginica

Virginia chain fern
Virginia Chain Fern is a great native landscaping fern for those tough areas with moist or saturated soils. Spreading quickly, it provides a dense, weed-resistant groundcover in damp sites or sunny pond edges. It also is beautiful, and less assertive, in average garden conditions.
Woodwardia virginica

Zizia aurea

Golden Alexanders

Golden clusters of 3-4" umbels in May and June. Deep green, leathery, handsomely divided basal foliage. Native to wooded bottomlands, stream banks, moist meadows, and floodplains east of the Rockies. Very attractive to butterflies.

Zizia aurea