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Landscape Plugs™

NEW SIZE!  Learn more about the LP50 plug here.

Our best low-maintenance native perennials and grasses are available in plugs designed to be planted directly in the ground. We offer a wide selection of Eastern US natives and their cultivars selected for beauty and durability. Two sizes are available for direct planting: deep LP50 plugs are 5 inches deep by 2 inches square and come 50 to a standard nursery tray. Many shallow-rooted plants are available in flats of 32 (3" by 2.5" square) and are also suited to planting in the ground. Our Landscape Plugs™ offer an exciting alternative for quick establishment of plants in landscapes and containers.

Plant Selection
We are very selective in our choices for the Landscape Plugs™ program so that your planting gets off to a great start. All plants in our plug program are native to the midatlantic states, well suited to this climate and tolerant of drought and extreme temperature fluctuations. Robust root systems make for quick establishment and less initial watering. Plants purchased in spring are vernalized and ready to grow.

Why Use Landscape Plugs™?

  • Plants usually reach flowering size in first season and have a high transplant success rate.
  • Quicker and more reliable than seed, with erosion control starting in weeks rather than months.
  • LP50 plugs have deep (5") roots that establish quickly.
  • Compact size is easy to transport - a real cost saver.
  • Plants are chosen for wide adaptability and ease of transplanting and establishment.
  • Excellent choices for wildlife habitat development, providing food & shelter for many species.
  • Plugs come in flats made of 100% recycled plastic and are #6 recyclable.

Many thanks to the Biota of North America Program (BONAP) for the use of their North American Plant Atlas species distribution maps, which can be found on each native Landscape Plug™ species page. Click the map image to enlarge and view the plant's distribution status by county via link to the BONAP site. All map images are courtesy: Kartesz, J.T., The Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2013. Taxonomic Data Center. (http://www.bonap.net/tdc). Chapel Hill, N.C. [maps generated from Kartesz, J.T. 2013. Floristic Synthesis of North America, Version 1.0. Biota of North America Program (BONAP). (in press)] 

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL

Acorus americanus

Sweetflag

Acorus americanus is a hardy perennial swamp or bog plant with sweet, spicy-scented leaves. Spadix-like flowers appear in June and July, followed by dark berries. Found at water's edge from Nova Scotia to Virginia to Washington to Alaska. Great for stabilizing pond edges or filling a boggy area.

Acorus americanus

Actaea pachypoda 'Misty Blue'

White baneberry

White baneberry is a striking, multi-stemmed woodland perennial selected for soft, bluish-green, finely cut foliage. Flowers appear in spring, followed by vivid, reddish pedicels which produce large, white 'doll’s eyes' fruit in autumn, persisting for 4-6 weeks. Fruit is marked by a distinct black dot. This cultivar was discovered in a planting of unknown origin at Mt. Cuba Center in Greenville, Delaware.

Actaea pachypoda 'Misty Blue'

Adiantum pedatum

Northern maidenhair

Dainty, bright green fronds are held aloft on shiny black stems, creating a light, airy texture in the woodland garden. In rich soil and bright shade it will spread by shallow rhizomes to form a dense groundcover. Found in the humus-rich woodlands and moist woods of Eastern North America. Easy to grow as long as the soil is loose and rich.

Adiantum pedatum

Agastache foeniculum

Anise hyssop

An upright, clump-forming perennial native to parts of the upper Midwest and Great Plains region. Lavender to purple flowers are densely packed along showy, cylindrical, terminal spikes mid to late summer. Medium green, lanceolate foliage remains clean throughout the season and carries a refreshing anise scent, attracting hummingbirds and butterflies.

Agastache foeniculum

Allium cernuum

Nodding onion
Found on ledges, in dry meadows, gravel, rocky or wooded slopes, this delicate onion has gently nodding pink flowers in late spring. Beautiful in the garden or naturalized in a meadow. Easy, dependable and very drought tolerant once established.
Allium cernuum

Amsonia 'Blue Ice'

Bluestar

This long-blooming, compact Amsonia blooms longer and stronger than the species and forms a dense, compact mound of dark green leaves that turn brilliant yellow in the fall. Looks fantastic in a gallon!

Amsonia 'Blue Ice'

Amsonia hubrichtii

Threadleaf bluestar

A graceful and long-lived native plant with very fine foliage, clusters of steel blue flowers in May and June on an upright, bushy plant. Excellent golden fall color. Thrives in full sun or part shade. No insect or pest problems. Found in Arkansas in 1942 by Leslie Hubricht.

Amsonia hubrichtii

Andropogon gerardii

Big bluestem

The king of native grasses, big bluestem has handsome gray to blue-green stems in spring, turning to green alternating with deep red in summer, then to coppery red in fall. Three-fingered seed heads top tall stems in August. Clump forming with excellent drought tolerance once established. Found naturally in moist meadows and along side roads and rivers from Canada to Mexico.

Andropogon gerardii

Andropogon gerardii 'Red October'

Big bluestem

Deep green foliage emerges in spring with notable red tips, providing an immediate display of color and texture. The real show begins around the first frost of October - the chill sends the graceful foliage into a flurry of vivid red, becoming topped with tall, scarlet red inflorescences swaying in the autumn breeze. Striking!

Andropogon gerardii 'Red October'

Andropogon virginicus

Broomsedge

An easy-to-grow, clump-forming, native warm season grass with incredible golden copper fall color. A pioneer soil stabilizing plant that does well in poor, infertile areas and surprisingly well in floodplains. It's wonderful for xeriscaping and restoration projects, or in coastal areas. The attractive fall and winter stems make a unique addition to cut flower arrangements!

Andropogon virginicus

Aquilegia canadensis

Wild columbine

Red flowers with yellow centers hang like drifts of softly illuminated lanterns in April and May. Excellent as a shady rock garden naturalizer, it also is quite content in average garden conditions. Occurs naturally in rich rocky woods, north-facing slopes, cliffs, ledges, pastures, and roadside banks. Native to all states east of the Rockies, but not found in Louisiana.

Aquilegia canadensis

Asarum canadense

Wild ginger

An attractive native groundcover for moist shade, wild ginger spreads slowly via underground rhizomes. Lustrous dark green, kidney-shaped foliage usually obscure the unique brown jug-like flowers. Will naturalize; incorporate into a native plant garden or woodland display.

Asarum canadense

Asclepias incarnata

Asclepias incarnata

Swamp milkweed

One of the most beautiful of native perennials with clusters of upturned pink flowers in June and July. Much underused in average garden conditions! Attracts butterflies of all kinds. Willow-like leaves are 4-5" long. Occurs in floodplains and wet meadows.

Asclepias incarnata

Asclepias syriaca

Common milkweed

This native classic is best known as a food of larval monarch butterflies (along with its cousins A. incarnata and A. tuberosa). Robust, yet beautiful with deep pink clusters of fragrant flowers in June and July followed by lovely pods of silky seeds in October.

Asclepias syriaca

Asclepias tuberosa

Asclepias tuberosa

Butterfly weed

A tough, drought-tolerant native with intense orange flowers in mid to late summer. Attracts many varieties of butterflies and is especially attractive to Monarchs. A beautiful solution for a dry sunny slope! Occurs in dry fields and roadsides in most of the US.

Asclepias tuberosa

Asclepias verticillata

Horsetail milkweed

A widely adaptable and tough native that is a deer-resistant food for larval butterflies. The fine-textured foliage provides a dark green backdrop for the clusters of white flowers that appear in June and July.

Asclepias verticillata

Aster cordifolius

Blue wood aster

Clouds of blue flowers in early fall in shade! A great naturalizer under trees, at the edge of woods, or as a filler among Hostas and Astilbes, which look pretty rough by September. Found in woods and dry meadows.

Aster cordifolius

Aster divaricatus

White wood aster

Produces a fairyland of glistening small white daisies in September and October. Lovely when naturalized in shade and average to dry soil. Found in deciduous woods and along roadsides of the Eastern US.

Aster divaricatus

Aster ericoides 'Snow Flurry'

Heath aster

A very low, dense carpeting groundcover that is smothered with 1/2" single white flowers with gold centers in September. A good strong grower and a totally new look and use for Asters! Makes an excellent container plant.

Aster ericoides 'Snow Flurry'

Aster laevis 'Bluebird'

Aster laevis 'Bluebird'

Smooth aster

'Bluebird' is a superlative selection of the native smooth aster introduced by Dr. Richard Lighty of the Mt.Cuba Center. This tall, vase-shaped wildflower has large 1" diameter blue flowers held in cloud-like clusters at the tips of the arching branches. You can pinch back the young shoots in June for denser habit and more flowers, but it is not essential. Staking is helpful by late summer if you forget to pinch. Perfectly clean foliage makes for easy maintenance in production and in the landscape. Aster laevis is a great source of nectar for migrating monarchs and other late season butterflies.

Aster laevis 'Bluebird'

Aster novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'

New England aster

A naturally compact form with deep purple flowers in August and September. Eye-popping with Solidago 'Golden Fleece'. One of the most garden-worthy native selections out there. A fine introduction from the Mt. Cuba Center.

Aster novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'

Aster novae-angliae

New England aster

Blooms ranging from blue-purple to lavender-pink pop in the late summer and fall landscape. A large, showy native aster that is a must-have autumn nectar source for pollinators.

Aster novae-angliae

Aster novi-belgii

New York aster

Local midatlantic native of moist to wet meadows. Flowers may vary in shades of pink, purple and white and bloom in early fall, which is late August and early September here in PA.

Aster novi-belgii

Aster oblongifolius 'Raydon's Favorite'

Aromatic aster

Medium blue, fine textured single ray flowers in September and October, aromatic foliage. Irresistable, a really tremendous plant. Introduced by Holbrook Farm.

Aster oblongifolius 'Raydon's Favorite'

Aster tataricus 'Jindai'

Tatarian daisy

Large leaves (to 2') emerge in the spring and provide a bold backdrop for earlier blooming perennials. In the fall, numerous flower stalks rise to 4 or 5 feet and each is covered with 1" sky blue daisy-like flowers. Flowering is later than many other asters and this species often provides brilliant color until frost. Found by Rick Darke and Skip March at the Jin Dai Botanical Garden. This cultivar is shorter than the species and less likely to require staking.

Aster tataricus 'Jindai'

Athyrium angustum forma rubellum 'Lady in Red'

Lady fern

Strong-growing and dependable, the lady ferns are great garden plants. This selection from the New England Wildflower Society features red stems, making it a great choice to combine with purple-leaved plants. Tough and easy to grow, this sultry beauty is the right choice for perennial borders and woodlands alike. A breathtaking flush of new fronds appears in the spring, with new leaves appearing throughout the season for a continuously fresh look.

Athyrium angustum forma rubellum 'Lady in Red'

Athyrium filix-femina 'Victoriae'

Lady fern

"This is the most spectacular of all cultivars in its magnificent frond architecture. It is really the Queen of Green", according to Dr. John Mickel, former curator of ferns at the New York Botanical Garden and author of "Ferns for American Gardens". As with other forms of lady ferns there is so much variability with spore production that it is necessary to produce this form in tissue culture, so its clones are identical to the parent. This superb selection has fronds whose pinnae (leaflets) crisscross to form x's and has crested pinnae tips. Another superior cultivar in the Mickel Collection™.

Athyrium filix-femina 'Victoriae'

Athyrium filix-femina ssp. asplenioides

southern lady fern, asplenium ladyfern

Handsome crowns of feathery fronds are typical of this genus. Delicate and lacy with arching fronds and dark red stems at maturity. Strong-growing and dependable, lady ferns are great garden plants. Tough and easy to grow, this beauty is the right choice for perennial borders and woodlands alike. A breathtaking flush of new fronds appears in the spring, with new leaves appearing throughout the season for a continuously fresh look. Found in swamps, thickets and damp woods east of the Rockies.

Athyrium filix-femina ssp. asplenioides

Athyrium niponicum 'Regal Red'

Japanese painted fern

Handsome and ruffled, this high-color selection has been a much requested Japanese Painted Fern. The dark violet red interior of each 'Regal Red' frond is contrasted by bright silver edges making each leaflet distinct and creating an overall tapestry effect. The pinnules also twist a little giving the frond a "fluffed" up look. 'Regal Red' combines beautifully with red-purple Heuchera such as 'Plum Pudding' and blue sedges like Carex platyphylla or C. 'Blue Zinger'. The fronds work well in cut flower arrangements, providing lasting color and soft texture. Unique and beautiful!

Athyrium niponicum 'Regal Red'

Athyrium niponicum var. pictum

Japanese painted fern

The most colorful fern around with subtle shades of green, purple and red on a grey-blue background. The color is more intense with some direct sun, preferably morning or late afternoon. Strong-growing and dependable, the lady ferns are great garden plants.

Athyrium niponicum var. pictum

Athyrium x 'Ghost'

Lady fern

From the garden of Virginia's Nancy Swell comes this stunning lady fern with silver-white fronds and a decidedly upright habit. Leaves age to light green with new fronds appearing throughout the season. Upright with a beautiful formal appearance that really stands out in the shady garden. This fern really prefers shade and will stand up with all fronds perpendicular to the ground in full sun.

Athyrium x 'Ghost'

Baptisia 'Carolina Moonlight'

Wild indigo

Elegant spikes of creamy yellow blooms grace tidy blue-green foliage in early summer. Long-blooming and tough, a dazzling addition to the native plant palette. A hybrid of B. sphaerocarpa and B. alba, found by Rob Gardener of NC Botanical Gardens.

Baptisia 'Carolina Moonlight'

Baptisia 'Purple Smoke'

Wild indigo

Discovered by Rob Gardener of the North Carolina Botanical Gardens and introduced by Niche Gardens of Chapel Hill, NC. Apparently a chance hybrid of B. australis and B. alba, this has the charcoal-gray stems of alba and the blue color from australe, although it is more purple than B. australe. It is a good and vigorous grower and destined to be very much treasured.

Baptisia 'Purple Smoke'

Baptisia 'Solar Flare' Prairieblues™

False indigo

Tall spikes of pea flowers start out brilliant yellow and fade to deep orange as they age, beautifully complementing the emerging yellow blooms above. Another unique and lovely Baptisia from the Chicago Botanic Garden and Chicagoland Grows®!

Baptisia 'Solar Flare' Prairieblues™

Baptisia 'Midnight' Prairieblues™

False indigo

Features an elegant, vase-shaped habit and a profusion of deep violet-blue flowers on 24-inch-long racemes. Secondary stems extend the bloom season to 3-4 weeks! Fine textured foliage remains an attractive green all season. Vase-shaped habit primary stems are strongly erect; flowers are held well above the foliage.

Baptisia 'Midnight' Prairieblues™

Baptisia australis

Baptisia australis

False blue indigo
Blue spikes of pea-shaped flowers resemble the tall racemes of lupines in May and early June. A slow to mature, but very rewarding native garden perennial. Found in open woods, river banks and sandy floodplains, New York to Nebraska to Georgia.
Baptisia australis

Baptisia sphaerocarpa 'Screaming Yellow'

Wild indigo

A riot of yellow in late spring and early summer! Larry Loman of Ridgecrest Nursery in Wynne, Arkansas selected this brilliant yellow-gold Baptisia for the bodacious and profuse flower display, deep green foliage, and compact rounded habit.

Baptisia sphaerocarpa 'Screaming Yellow'

Baptisia × bicolor 'Starlite' Prairieblues™

Wild indigo

A second introduction from Chicagoland Grows®, 'Starlite' Prairieblues™ shines with soft blue pea flowers that glow white at the base for a sparkling overall appearance. A good strong grower with long spikes of flowers in early summer.

Baptisia × bicolor 'Starlite' Prairieblues™

Baptisia × variicolor 'Twilite' Prairieblues™

False indigo

Twilite Prairieblues™ is the first introduction from the Baptisia breeding program conducted by Dr. Jim Ault at the Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe, Illinois. The B. australis x sphaerocarpa cross has brought us a very strong and production friendly plant with excellent hybrid vigor. By the third year these plants produce almost 100 flower spikes of unique deep violet-purple, nearly burgundy flowers highlighted by a lemon-yellow keel. Held above the handsome foliage, the inflorescences can be up to 32" long!

Baptisia × variicolor 'Twilite' Prairieblues™

Bouteloua curtipendula

Sideoats grama

This drought tolerant grass is native to open rocky woodlands and mixed grass prairies. The plant features a distinctive inflorescence, an oat-like spikelet that originates in a faded purple hue and lightens to tan in the fall. The fall foliage color is golden brown fading to red-orange and purple shades. This warm season grass is often over-looked as a specimen; however the unique flowers serve as a striking focal point in a small garden and mixes well in meadow plantings, as its stature compliments others well in the spring. We recommend this rhizomatous plant for use when a site is damaged by drought or grazing. Despite its ability to rehabilitate landscapes, it spreads at a very slow rate.

Bouteloua curtipendula

Bouteloua gracilis 'Blonde Ambition'

Blue grama

Where low maintenance meets garden whimsy, 'Blonde Ambition' is sure to turn heads. Airy, chartreuse flowers float horizontally amidst blue-green foliage from mid-summer into fall. Seed heads extend the season providing unique winter appeal. Extremely cold hardy and adaptable to various soil types, use in sweeps for a dramatic effect. Unlike any other ornamental grass in cultivation, discovered and introduced by David Salman of High Country Gardens.

Bouteloua gracilis 'Blonde Ambition'

Caltha palustris

Marsh marigold

Native to northern states and Canada, this little beauty is at home at pond's edge or along a stream. It is clumping by nature, but can seed in to form a dense groundcover in a consistently moist site. In early spring, hundreds of bright yellow buttercup flowers dot the green carpet of cordate foliage. Deer usually leave this alone! Found in marshes, swamps, and wet meadows from North Carolina to Alaska.

Caltha palustris

Carex 'Silver Sceptre'

Japanese sedge

A beautiful selection of this sedge, this one has narrow (1/4") leaves with white margins, giving it a very fine texture overall. Rhizomatous, forming thick silvery clumps. A bright addition to the shade palette!

Carex 'Silver Sceptre'

Carex 'Silver Sceptre'

Japanese sedge

A beautiful selection of this sedge, this one has narrow (1/4") leaves with white margins, giving it a very fine texture overall. Rhizomatous, forming thick silvery clumps. A bright addition to the shade palette!

Carex 'Silver Sceptre'

Carex amphibola

Creek sedge

Carex amphibola is a widely adaptable native sedge naturally occurring from Texas to Quebec and Georgia to New Hampshire. The compact and semi-erect mound has proven to be semi evergreen (zone 6b) and prefers deciduous shade in upland or even floodplain conditions; easily adapts to fine or medium textured soils. Creek sedge lends itself well to native shade gardens, along wood paths or as a slope stabilizer. It is a vigorous clump former with shiny, narrow green foliage 1/8" wide by up to 12" long. C. amphibola is an excellent companion for Phlox divaricata, Asarum, Chrysogonum and Polygonatum...among others!

Carex amphibola

Carex amphibola

Creek sedge

Carex amphibola is a widely adaptable native sedge naturally occurring from Texas to Quebec and Georgia to New Hampshire. The compact and semi-erect mound has proven to be semi evergreen (zone 6b) and prefers deciduous shade in upland or even floodplain conditions; easily adapts to fine or medium textured soils. Creek sedge lends itself well to native shade gardens, along wood paths or as a slope stabilizer. It is a vigorous clump former with shiny, narrow green foliage 1/8" wide by up to 12" long. C. amphibola is an excellent companion for Phlox divaricata, Asarum, Chrysogonum and Polygonatum...among others!

Carex amphibola

Carex appalachica

Carex appalachica

Appalachian sedge

This lovely sedge is native to the dry woods of eastern North America. Its fine texture and fountaining habit make it a lovely groundcover in dry shady sites, even in the root zone of trees. Its tidy clumping habit makes it a perfect feature in a container, rock or stump, or in a border planting along a walkway.

Carex appalachica

Carex appalachica

Carex appalachica

Appalachian sedge

This lovely sedge is native to the dry woods of eastern North America. Its fine texture and fountaining habit make it a lovely groundcover in dry shady sites, even in the root zone of trees. Its tidy clumping habit makes it a perfect feature in a container, rock or stump, or in a border planting along a walkway.

Carex appalachica

Carex cherokeensis

Cherokee sedge

C. cherokeensis prefers moist conditions but, tolerates some variables. It prefers some shade including dappled light from trees or even just reprieve from the heat of the afternoon sun.  The inflorescence has been noted as insignificant but, we like the little wispy spikes that add a bit of interest in the spring. It can be evergreen in milder climates, a harsh cut back may harm.  It is better to give a little light haircut to improve its appearance.

Carex cherokeensis

Carex cherokeensis

Cherokee sedge

C. cherokeensis prefers moist conditions but, tolerates some variables. It prefers some shade including dappled light from trees or even just reprieve from the heat of the afternoon sun.  The inflorescence has been noted as insignificant but, we like the little wispy spikes that add a bit of interest in the spring. It can be evergreen in milder climates, a harsh cut back may harm.  It is better to give a little light haircut to improve its appearance.

Carex cherokeensis

Carex comosa

Longhair sedge

A native sedge that works well for mass plantings in moist to wet areas. Tolerates some salinity.

Carex comosa

Carex comosa

Longhair sedge

A native sedge that works well for mass plantings in moist to wet areas. Tolerates some salinity.

Carex comosa

Carex dolichostachya Gold Fountains™ 'Kaga-nishiki'

Gold Fountains sedge

This shade-loving sister of C. 'Evergold' is bright gold with attractive narrow (1/4") foliage almost all year. Striking, long-lived and reliable. Works well in average garden conditions and in containers.

Carex dolichostachya Gold Fountains™ 'Kaga-nishiki'

Carex dolichostachya Gold Fountains™ 'Kaga-nishiki'

Gold Fountains sedge

This shade-loving sister of C. 'Evergold' is bright gold with attractive narrow (1/4") foliage almost all year. Striking, long-lived and reliable. Works well in average garden conditions and in containers.

Carex dolichostachya Gold Fountains™ 'Kaga-nishiki'

Carex eburnea

Bristleleaf sedge

A wonderful naturalizer, Carex eburnea is the ideal native groundcover for the woodland or rock garden. Petite colonies of 6-8 inch long soft, thread-like foliage takes on a spherical shape as inconspicuous whitish-green flower spikes appear in early spring.

Carex eburnea

Carex eburnea

Bristleleaf sedge

A wonderful naturalizer, Carex eburnea is the ideal native groundcover for the woodland or rock garden. Petite colonies of 6-8 inch long soft, thread-like foliage takes on a spherical shape as inconspicuous whitish-green flower spikes appear in early spring.

Carex eburnea

Carex emoryi

Emory's sedge

A wetland native that forms dense colonies of straw-colored leaves at the base with bright green new growth emerging from the top. An emergent aquatic, Carex emoryi is found on shores, stream banks, wet meadows, and seepage areas from Newfoundland south to Virginia and from Manitoba south to eastern Oklahoma and Texas.

Carex emoryi

Carex emoryi

Emory's sedge

A wetland native that forms dense colonies of straw-colored leaves at the base with bright green new growth emerging from the top. An emergent aquatic, Carex emoryi is found on shores, stream banks, wet meadows, and seepage areas from Newfoundland south to Virginia and from Manitoba south to eastern Oklahoma and Texas.

Carex emoryi

Carex flacca 'Blue Zinger'

Glaucous sedge

This Emerald Coast introduction is indeed an improvement over the species. It is much more light blue than what we'd previously grown. Excellent and versatile shade groundcover for dry or moist spots. Cool season, evergreen in warm climates, more clump forming than C. flacca.

Carex flacca 'Blue Zinger'

Carex flacca 'Blue Zinger'

Glaucous sedge

This Emerald Coast introduction is indeed an improvement over the species. It is much more light blue than what we'd previously grown. Excellent and versatile shade groundcover for dry or moist spots. Cool season, evergreen in warm climates, more clump forming than C. flacca.

Carex flacca 'Blue Zinger'

Carex flaccosperma

Blue wood sedge

A beautiful native groundcover with striking glaucus blue foliage, Blue wood sedge is easy to grow and evergreen in warmer zones, though it benefits from a late winter cut back. Early spring flowers are slender and form interesting seed heads. Forms tidy clumps and spreads by seed.

Carex flaccosperma

Carex flaccosperma

Blue wood sedge

A beautiful native groundcover with striking glaucus blue foliage, Blue wood sedge is easy to grow and evergreen in warmer zones, though it benefits from a late winter cut back. Early spring flowers are slender and form interesting seed heads. Forms tidy clumps and spreads by seed.

Carex flaccosperma

Carex laxiculmus Bunny Blue® 'HOBB'

Carex laxiculmus Bunny Blue® 'HOBB'

Bunny Blue sedge

Bunny Blue® is a low growing, evergreen, native sedge with silver-blue foliage. Use as a ground cover or specimen plant for moist to average shady areas. Native plant.

Carex laxiculmus Bunny Blue® 'HOBB'

Carex laxiculmus Bunny Blue® 'HOBB'

Carex laxiculmus Bunny Blue® 'HOBB'

Bunny Blue sedge

Bunny Blue® is a low growing, evergreen, native sedge with silver-blue foliage. Use as a ground cover or specimen plant for moist to average shady areas. Native plant.

Carex laxiculmus Bunny Blue® 'HOBB'

Carex lurida

Shallow sedge

This cool-season grass provides excellent erosion control.

Carex lurida

Carex lurida

Shallow sedge

This cool-season grass provides excellent erosion control.

Carex lurida

Carex morrowii 'Ice Dance'

Japanese sedge

A bright groundcover for a shady spot, 'Ice Dance' has long shiny leaves trimmed in bright white. It spreads slowly to fill in and make a tidy cover that discourages weeds. Deer and disease resistant, it is long-lasting and easy to grow!

Carex morrowii 'Ice Dance'

Carex morrowii 'Ice Dance'

Japanese sedge

A bright groundcover for a shady spot, 'Ice Dance' has long shiny leaves trimmed in bright white. It spreads slowly to fill in and make a tidy cover that discourages weeds. Deer and disease resistant, it is long-lasting and easy to grow!

Carex morrowii 'Ice Dance'

Carex muskingumensis

Muskingum sedge

Naturally occuring in moist habitats such as low, swampy woods and wet meadows, but will tolerate some drought.

Carex muskingumensis

Carex muskingumensis

Muskingum sedge

Naturally occuring in moist habitats such as low, swampy woods and wet meadows, but will tolerate some drought.

Carex muskingumensis

Carex oshimensis 'Evergold'

Golden sedge

Fountains of narrow leaves with broad cream stripes adorn this clump-forming, shade-loving grass. 'Evergold' is lovely spilling over into a path or as an architectural feature in a container or window box. Deer and disease resistant, it is long-lasting and easy to grow!

Carex oshimensis 'Evergold'

Carex oshimensis 'Evergold'

Golden sedge

Fountains of narrow leaves with broad cream stripes adorn this clump-forming, shade-loving grass. 'Evergold' is lovely spilling over into a path or as an architectural feature in a container or window box. Deer and disease resistant, it is long-lasting and easy to grow!

Carex oshimensis 'Evergold'

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everest'

Japanese sedge

No gardening mountain is too high to master with this easy to grow sedge! Adaptable to a variety of conditions, tuck 'Everest' into a border, living wall or mixed container for a four season display of tidy, mounding foliage. Icy white margins frost the edges of deep green arching leaves. Enjoy year-round color with this versatile ornamental grass from the EverColor® series.

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everest'

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everest'

Japanese sedge

No gardening mountain is too high to master with this easy to grow sedge! Adaptable to a variety of conditions, tuck 'Everest' into a border, living wall or mixed container for a four season display of tidy, mounding foliage. Icy white margins frost the edges of deep green arching leaves. Enjoy year-round color with this versatile ornamental grass from the EverColor® series.

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everest'

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everillo'

Japanese sedge

Impossible to miss in even the shadiest of gardens, the fantastically bright lime green foliage of this showstopping variety ages to a golden yellow. Easy to grow in many locations, tuck 'Everillo' into a border, living wall or mixed container for a four season display of tidy, mounding foliage.

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everillo'

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everillo'

Japanese sedge

Impossible to miss in even the shadiest of gardens, the fantastically bright lime green foliage of this showstopping variety ages to a golden yellow. Easy to grow in many locations, tuck 'Everillo' into a border, living wall or mixed container for a four season display of tidy, mounding foliage.

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everillo'

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everlime'

Japanese sedge

Lime green margins edge the glossy green leaves of this superb variety. Easy to grow in many locations, tuck 'Everlime' into a border, living wall or mixed container for a four season display of tidy, mounding foliage. Enjoy year-round color with this versatile ornamental grass from the EverColor® series.

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everlime'

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everlime'

Japanese sedge

Lime green margins edge the glossy green leaves of this superb variety. Easy to grow in many locations, tuck 'Everlime' into a border, living wall or mixed container for a four season display of tidy, mounding foliage. Enjoy year-round color with this versatile ornamental grass from the EverColor® series.

Carex oshimensis EverColor® 'Everlime'

Carex pensylvanica

Carex pensylvanica

Oak sedge

With its tough disposition and spreading habit, this native grass makes an excellent shade groundcover. Fine texture and fountaining habit give this sedge a soft appearance that is lovely as an underplanting for bolder shade perennials or on its own as a shade lawn. Great in containers too! Easy to grow. Happiest in the company of oaks, but who isn't?

Carex pensylvanica

Carex pensylvanica

Carex pensylvanica

Oak sedge

With its tough disposition and spreading habit, this native grass makes an excellent shade groundcover. Fine texture and fountaining habit give this sedge a soft appearance that is lovely as an underplanting for bolder shade perennials or on its own as a shade lawn. Great in containers too! Easy to grow. Happiest in the company of oaks, but who isn't?

Carex pensylvanica

Carex plantaginea

Seersucker sedge
Shiny deep green leaves are unusually broad (to 1 1/8") and puckered like Christmas ribbon. An excellent, mostly evergreen (the basal foliage overwinters) groundcover for average to moist shade, provides unique texture. Flowers occur in early to mid-spring, thin and black-tipped, not especially showy. Found in moist woods from Canada to Alabama.
Carex plantaginea

Carex plantaginea

Seersucker sedge
Shiny deep green leaves are unusually broad (to 1 1/8") and puckered like Christmas ribbon. An excellent, mostly evergreen (the basal foliage overwinters) groundcover for average to moist shade, provides unique texture. Flowers occur in early to mid-spring, thin and black-tipped, not especially showy. Found in moist woods from Canada to Alabama.
Carex plantaginea

Carex platyphylla

Silver sedge

A spectacular clump-forming sedge with powder blue leaves up to an inch or more wide. Spreads slowly to form a wonderfully textured groundcover in moist or average soil. Tolerates dry shade once established. An early spring haircut makes room for clean new growth. Great for deciduous shade.

Carex platyphylla

Carex platyphylla

Silver sedge

A spectacular clump-forming sedge with powder blue leaves up to an inch or more wide. Spreads slowly to form a wonderfully textured groundcover in moist or average soil. Tolerates dry shade once established. An early spring haircut makes room for clean new growth. Great for deciduous shade.

Carex platyphylla

Carex radiata

Eastern star sedge

An attractive, native perennial sedge that forms dense tufts of foliage reaching 1–2' in height with an equal spread. Inflorescences range from 1-3" in length; blooming late spring. Very adaptable, dappled sunlight to medium shade, moist to mesic conditions, and a rich loamy soil with abundant organic matter. Incorporate with native ferns or spring ephemerals such as Mertensia virginica and mayapple. Seeds are enjoyed by various songbirds.

Carex radiata

Carex radiata

Eastern star sedge

An attractive, native perennial sedge that forms dense tufts of foliage reaching 1–2' in height with an equal spread. Inflorescences range from 1-3" in length; blooming late spring. Very adaptable, dappled sunlight to medium shade, moist to mesic conditions, and a rich loamy soil with abundant organic matter. Incorporate with native ferns or spring ephemerals such as Mertensia virginica and mayapple. Seeds are enjoyed by various songbirds.

Carex radiata

Carex siderosticha 'Variegata'

Creeping broadleaf sedge
This is a very bright and attractive spreading groundcover. Wide bright green leaves with distinct white stripes form slowly spreading clumps. It is completely deciduous, often emerging just when you wonder if it has made it through the winter. Noted plantsman Charles Oliver has had this in his zone 5 garden for 10 years. At 8-10", it is an excellent groundcover or edging for the shade garden.
Carex siderosticha 'Variegata'

Carex siderosticha 'Variegata'

Creeping broadleaf sedge
This is a very bright and attractive spreading groundcover. Wide bright green leaves with distinct white stripes form slowly spreading clumps. It is completely deciduous, often emerging just when you wonder if it has made it through the winter. Noted plantsman Charles Oliver has had this in his zone 5 garden for 10 years. At 8-10", it is an excellent groundcover or edging for the shade garden.
Carex siderosticha 'Variegata'

Carex stricta

Tussock sedge

A wetland native that forms dense tussocks of straw-colored leaves at the base with bright green new growth emerging from the top. Spreads via rhizomes. Found in wet meadows. Emergent aquatic.

Carex stricta

Carex stricta

Tussock sedge

A wetland native that forms dense tussocks of straw-colored leaves at the base with bright green new growth emerging from the top. Spreads via rhizomes. Found in wet meadows. Emergent aquatic.

Carex stricta

Carex vulpinoidea

Fox sedge

One of the most widespread species of Carex in North America, growing in wet meadows, prairies, swamps and marshes.  The seedheads mature in late summer and resemble fox tails, hence the common name.

Carex vulpinoidea

Carex vulpinoidea

Fox sedge

One of the most widespread species of Carex in North America, growing in wet meadows, prairies, swamps and marshes.  The seedheads mature in late summer and resemble fox tails, hence the common name.

Carex vulpinoidea

Caryopteris 'Dark Knight'

Blue mist shrub

Blue mist shrub is aptly named as its gray-green foliage is shrouded in a cloud of blue from mid to late summer. It is a well-behaved garden plant that is very attractive to butterflies. 'Dark Knight' has deep purple blue flowers closely spaced on long stems.

Caryopteris 'Dark Knight'

Caryopteris × clandonensis 'Inoveris' Grand Bleu®

Blue mist shrub

Blue mist shrub is aptly named as it is shrouded in a cloud of blue from mid to late summer. It is a well-behaved garden plant that is very attractive to butterflies. Grand Bleu® boasts numerous deep blue flowers topping glossy green foliage on a neatly compact plant.

Caryopteris × clandonensis 'Inoveris' Grand Bleu®

Chasmanthium latifolium

Chasmanthium latifolium

Northern sea oats

A versatile native grass with bamboo-like foliage and delightful nodding seed heads that rustle in the breeze from late summer to winter. It grows in most sites and is a quite vigorous groundcover when given consistent moisture and sun. It is better behaved in average garden conditions and in shade. A unique cut flower in fresh or dry arrangements.

Chasmanthium latifolium

Chelone glabra

Chelone glabra

Turtlehead

Spikes of elegant white flowers top shiny green foliage in late summer and early fall. Grows best in moist meadows, stream banks, and swamps. Favorite breeding site for the Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly.

Chelone glabra

Chelone lyonii 'Hot Lips'

Turtlehead

Lustrous, deep green foliage is topped in August and September with rose pink, turtle-head-shaped flowers. Red stems persist most of the season. Bronze green early season growth is another distinctive feature.

Chelone lyonii 'Hot Lips'

Chrysogonum virginianum var. australe

Green and gold

One of our favorite native groundcovers for the woodland garden. Yellow daisy-like flowers cover 6" evergreen foliage in spring. Rosettes of leaves slowly spread stoloniferously. Looks great with columbine and Virginia bluebells. This golden star is very similar to Chrysogonum virginianum 'Allen Bush', but has shorter stems and stolons that spread above ground. With a compact and low growing form, this plant has deep, shiny green foliage and golden, star shaped flowers.

Chrysogonum virginianum var. australe

Coreopsis verticillata

Coreopsis verticillata

Whorled tickseed

This hardy species is a delightful and tough landscape solution. Taller and more vigorous than 'Moonbeam' or 'Zagreb', it has bright yellow flowers for 8 weeks or more, from late May to early August and often later. Drought tolerant and easy to grow in a garden or along the roadside.

Coreopsis verticillata

Dennstaedtia punctilobula

Eastern hay scented fern

This common North American native has beautiful hairy fronds, oval-oblong in outline, yellow-green in color, thin textured and smells like new mown hay when crushed. It is found in open sandy meadows and thinly wooded slopes and is the first fern to colonize after a fire denudes a slope. It tends to spread too rapidly for use in a small garden, but is attractive and carefree in larger gardens where there is plenty of room for it to spread as a groundcover. In fall, the fronds turn coppery orange, providing a vibrant and stunning carpet beneath the changing leaves.

Dennstaedtia punctilobula

Deschampsia cespitosa 'Goldtau'

Tufted hairgrass

Selected for deep, dark-green foliage, late blooming period, clump-forming habit and airy, golden-yellow flowers that emerge in June and last through to September. Attractive seed heads persist through winter. An eye catching cool season, semi-evergreen ornamental grass perfectly suited for part sun to shade.

Deschampsia cespitosa 'Goldtau'

Deschampsia cespitosa

Tufted hairgrass

An ornamental grass that does well in moderately shady locations.  Airy masses of finely branched, light green infloresences rise above the neatly rounded tufts of narrow, dark green foliage in early summer, and remain intact long enough to provide some early winter interest.

Deschampsia cespitosa

Deschampsia flexuosa

Wavy hairgrass

A delightful and elegant native, this diminutive grass thrives in dry shade. Fine-textured and delicate in appearance, it is tough and drought tolerant, ideal for planting in any well-drained shady location as a groundcover. In spring it is topped with graceful feathery flowers that are lovely as they move quietly in the breeze.

Deschampsia flexuosa

Dicentra eximia

Wild bleeding heart

A popular plant for the shade garden, Dicentra eximia is a tremendous performer. The leaves are deeply cut and fern like. The pink flowers are oblong heart shaped with an inner petal that drips from the outer petals, creating the appearance that the heart is bleeding. The flowers are smaller and longer than the old-fashioned bleeding heart, but in long branching inflorescences that encourage a more floriferous species.

Dicentra eximia

Dryopteris erythrosora 'Brilliance'

Autumn fern

Autumn fern is a colorful groundcover with pink fiddleheads that turn coppery orange as they unfurl. Fronds age to a lustrous dark green and remain well into winter. New growth continues through the season, giving a colorful tapestry effect of copper and green from spring to late fall.

Dryopteris erythrosora 'Brilliance'

Dryopteris goldiana

Goldie's woodfern

This is the largest of the native wood ferns, reaching 4' in ideal conditions. It is a stately and slowly spreading groundcover, forming large clusters of graceful arching fronds. Named for Scottish botanist John Goldie, its fronds are green without a hint of gold. Dryopteris goldiana is native to seepage slopes and moist woods from Newfoundland to Georgia, west to Minnesota and Arkansas.

Dryopteris goldiana

Dryopteris marginalis

Dryopteris marginalis

Eastern woodfern
The leathery leaves of Dryopteris marginalis are a beautiful addition to the woodland garden and can form a lovely an easy to maintain groundcover. A sturdy east coast native, it forms a tidy clump that will not spread and is very tolerant of dry shade conditions once it has established. Marginal wood fern is often found in shaded crevices of rocky ledges and bluffs from Newfoundland to Georgia, west to Oklahoma and Minnesota.
Dryopteris marginalis

Dryopteris x australis

Dixie woodfern

Dryopteris x australis is a natural hybrid (D. celsa x ludoviciana) found in wild populations from Louisiana to Virginia, but is a superb garden plant as far north as Zone 5. It is taller than either parent and a formidable addition to the garden.

Dryopteris x australis

Echinacea paradoxa

Yellow purple coneflower

A Yellow Purple Coneflower... thus the paradox. Relatively rare in the wild and in cultivation, this coneflower is stunning in summer. Its bright, pure yellow flowers consist of drooping petals surrounding a soft brown cone. Goldfinches devour the seeds. Native to the Ozark Mountains and surrounding areas.

Echinacea paradoxa

Echinacea purpurea 'Ruby Star'

Echinacea purpurea 'Ruby Star'

Purple coneflower

Introduced by Jelitto, who gave us 'Magnus', Echinacea 'Ruby Star' is a slightly shorter plant with large flat topped flowers that are a deeper purple pink, almost ruby red, than most others. Plants are easy to grow, tough, and heat and drought tolerant once established. Their roots have famous medicinal qualities, they make great, long lasting, cut flowers and attract numerous butterflies and small birds.

Echinacea purpurea 'Ruby Star'

Echinacea purpurea

Purple coneflower

One of the great butterfly magnets of the native perennial garden! Coneflowers are easy to grow in average to dry, well drained soils. Flowers with large orange gold spiky centers and strong reflexed rose pink petals appear in July and August. Very drought tolerant.

Echinacea purpurea

Elymus virginicus

Virginia wildrye

Green to silvery blue foliage, often with a waxy appearance, is topped with 3-6" long spikelets in late spring and early summer.

Elymus virginicus

Eragrostis spectabilis

Purple lovegrass
Fluffy clouds of bronze-red inflorescenses are soft and subtle in the sunlight. Light green foliage in summer turning to a bronzy-red in fall. Irresistable texture plant for the late summer garden.
Eragrostis spectabilis

Erigeron pulchellus var. pulchellus 'Lynnhaven Carpet'

Robin's plantain

This outstanding form of E. pulchellus was selected for its relatively large grey-green, pubescent foliage (4"), dense, mat-forming habit and astonishing ability to thrive in a wide range of challenging conditions. In early May, individual flower stalks give rise to lightly tinted lavender flowers with a yellow inner eye. Foliage remains less than 6" and forms a tight groundcover, while flowering stems top out at just over a foot tall. Originally found growing on the 27-acre property of Clarice Keeling of Virginia Beach, VA, 'Lynnhaven Carpet' was named after Virginia Beach’s Lynnhaven River by plantsman Charles Cresson. An easy to grow, carefree native perennial perfectly suited for moderate sunlight to full shade. Enjoy!

Erigeron pulchellus var. pulchellus 'Lynnhaven Carpet'

Eriogonum allenii 'Little Rascal'

Shale barrens buckwheat

This beautiful, long-flowering workhorse is a durable plant that thrives in urban plantings, rock gardens or any consistently dry site. With a tidy, low-growing habit of gray-green, paddle-shaped leaves, it bursts with golden yellow umbels that age to various shades of bronzy orange in the late summer. A wonderful little plant at 18-24” tall, it provides habitat and nectar for butterflies, honeybees, bumblebees and hummingbirds. It is also a great selection for those who enjoy cut flowers.

Eriogonum allenii 'Little Rascal'

Eryngium yuccifolium

Button eryngo

A unique and eye-catching plant for a dry, sunny site. Slightly spiny leaves are arranged in a rosette that resembles Yucca. Flower stems shoot skyward in summer and are topped with thistle-like bluish silver flowers. An architectural addition to the perennial border or meadow. Found in moist and dry sandy soils in open woods, fields, and prairies; Virginia to Minnesota, south to Texas and Florida.

Eryngium yuccifolium

Eupatorium 'Phantom'

Joe Pye weed

This short and sweet dwarf variety is fantastic for use in perennial borders, rain gardens and mixed containers with its shorter stature and upright habit. Attractive, dome-shaped clusters of tiny, rosy-purple blooms are a favorite of butterflies and gardeners alike, lasting from mid-summer through fall before turning into tufts of fuzzy seed heads with late autumn interest. A clump-forming perennial with whorls of coarse green leaves on sturdy stems.

Eupatorium 'Phantom'

Eupatorium coelestinum

Eupatorium coelestinum

Hardy ageratum
Fuzzy blue flowers atop attractive red stems, in September and October, make great cut flowers. This plant can be aggressive in Southern gardens. Found in old fields, meadows, and along stream banks. Naturalizes readily.
Eupatorium coelestinum

Eupatorium dubium 'Little Joe'

Eupatorium dubium 'Little Joe'

Joe Pye weed
Selected by Steve Lighty while at The Conard-Pyle Co., this dimunitive Joe Pye has the vivid color of 'Gateway' at a height more appropriate for small gardens. 'Little Joe 'is also more compact in a container too.
Eupatorium dubium 'Little Joe'

Eupatorium fistulosum

Joe Pye weed

Trumpetweed is a robust, upright perennial with hollow purple stems accented by huge, rounded, tight clusters of pink or purplish-mauve flowers. It is an important pollen and nectar plant and attracts butterflies (particularly the swallowtail butterfly) and other pollinaters by the dozens. Its height makes it an excellent backround plant in border perennial beds, but is also majestic standing alone. Flower color is darker in cooler weather.

Eupatorium fistulosum

Eupatorium hyssopifolium

Hyssop-leaf thoroughwort

A dry meadow and sandy field native with white flowers and very fine-textured foliage. Flat topped clusters of white fringed flowers have the overall appearence of clouds - very attractive and often underutilized. Wonderful as late summer texture.

Eupatorium hyssopifolium

Eupatorium perfoliatum

Common boneset

Loose, white, flat-topped flowers over deep green foliage with hairy stems. E. perfoliatum is a clumping, slightly aromatic, easy to grow plant with low maintenance. Great for attracting butterflies. E. perfoliatum may be used in border and wildflower gardens, around the banks of a pond and in areas in which it may naturalize.

Eupatorium perfoliatum

Eupatorium purpureum ssp. maculatum 'Gateway'

Joe Pye weed

Like others in this genus, 'Gateway' is no exception in its power to attract butterflies with its huge, bright mauve-pink flower clusters atop deep wine red stems. July to September bloom makes 'Gateway' a bold and dramatic display when planted with Rudbeckia 'Autumn Sun' or tall ornamental grasses. Outrageous!

Eupatorium purpureum ssp. maculatum 'Gateway'

Geranium maculatum 'Espresso'

Wild geranium

We are very excited to offer our own selection from the woods of Landenberg! Pale lavender-pink flowers over very attractive maroon-purple foliage. A bold new look for our native cranesbill, useful as a groundcover or shade garden feature plant. G. maculatum is found naturally in open woods, clearings, woods edges and roadsides throughout the Eastern US.

Geranium maculatum 'Espresso'

Geranium maculatum

Wild geranium
We are back on track with this great woodland native! Easy to grow in most shady spots, it flowers in spring with pink or lavender blooms. Found in open woods, clearings, woods edges and roadsides throughout the Eastern US. A necessary component for the shade meadow!
Geranium maculatum

Geum fragarioides

Appalachian barren strawberry

Bright, golden-yellow, 5-petaled flowers bloom early to late spring creating a striking accent against evergreen, trifoliate leaves. Flowers and foliage appear on separate stalks; foliage spreads by rhizomes just below the soil surface. A multi-seasonal, ornamental groundcover for the native garden.

Geum fragarioides

Hakonechloa macra 'Albovariegata'

White-striped Hakone grass

This exceptionally elegant grass deserves a spot in every garden with its graceful habit and easy culture. Narrow stripes of creamy white accent each deep green leaf, providing a bright glimmer as the leaves sway gently in the breeze. Taller than other selections, 'Albovariegata' is also more vigorous and should be planted in groups of three or more for best effect. It is very tolerant of sun if the soil does not dry out, but may be happiest in a bright shaded spot. Airy flowers appear in late summer as the foliage becomes tipped in pink.

Hakonechloa macra 'Albovariegata'

Helenium autumnale

Common sneezeweed

Our local native with yellow or bronze single daisy-like flowers on stout branched stems in late summer. Petals have distinct tooth-like indentations; hence the common name, dog-toothed daisy. All sneezeweeds have three-lobed petals which distiguish them from Rudbeckia and other yellow coneflowers. Brown, rust colored fruit appear in fall. Great for cut flowers and the avid butterfly gardener.

Helenium autumnale

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen'

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen'

Sunflower

A free-flowering plant to brighten up the late summer garden. Covered in intense light yellow single 2-3" flowers from July to September. An irresistible butterfly plant.

Helianthus 'Lemon Queen'

Helianthus × multiflorus 'Sunshine Daydream' Garden Candy™

Many-flowered sunflower

'Sunshine Daydream' was found as a branch sport of 'Capenoch Star'. This selection has fully double blooms with petals that re-curve toward the stem. 'Capenoch Star' has small, true sunflower-like blooms. This selection has also been compared to 'Flore Pleno'. 'Sunshine Daydream' has fully rounded, dahlia-like blooms that are smaller in diameter, but much more numerous in quantity. In comparison to 'Loddon's Gold', the blooms of 'Sunshine Daydream' have a much more pincushion or dome-like appearance and a more uniform shape. This selection is also the most golden-yellow of the three.

Helianthus × multiflorus 'Sunshine Daydream' Garden Candy™

Heliopsis helianthoides

Smooth oxeye

This local native sunflower happily naturalizes in moist or dry conditions. Upright and clump forming with bright, 2", single, medium gold flowers for eight weeks, peaking in July. Imagine, a self sowing butterfly magnet, that also doubles as a birdfeeder in the fall. Excellent cut flower!

 

Heliopsis helianthoides

Helleborus Brandywine™

Lenten rose

We are delighted to have introduced this magnificent series from Hellebore breeder David Culp! His 15 years of breeding using rare species and prized selections from collectors and specialty nurseries has produced a premium strain with clear colors and distinctive forms. This group promises plenty of doubles and anemones, as well as dark reds, spotted pinks, picotees, and apricots. A keen eye, hand pollination, and years of careful selection mean beautiful plants for you!

Helleborus Brandywine™

Helleborus foetidus

Bearsfoot hellebore
Intriguing, finely cut, leathery dark green foliage makes an interesting and nearly evergreen groundcover for average to dry shade. Numerous chartreuse bell-like flowers, often rimmed in red, are held above leaves in late winter. One of the first bloomers in spring!
Helleborus foetidus

Helleborus Winter Thriller™ 'Red Racer'

Lenten rose

The Winter Thriller™ series from Chris Hansen includes a variety of cultivars and a mix with wonderful flower colors and shapes – including large, 3” single and double petalled blooms in both solid and speckled shades of white, green, pink, red and purple. Long blooming from late winter through spring with deep, evergreen foliage.

Helleborus Winter Thriller™ 'Red Racer'

Helleborus Winter Thriller™ 'Midnight Ruffles'

Lenten rose

'Midnight Ruffles' holds us in captivation with her highly sought after 3" wide double black flowering blooms that gently hang down atop rich, evergreen foliage.

Helleborus Winter Thriller™ 'Midnight Ruffles'

Helleborus Winter Thriller™ 'Wedding Ruffles'

Lenten rose

A beauty amongst the late winter landscape with double white flowers that walk proudly down the late winter borders. Twice the flower power as single flowering forms with a vibrant green inner eye.

Helleborus Winter Thriller™ 'Wedding Ruffles'

Helleborus × ericsmithii Winter Magic™ 'Candy Love'

Lenten rose

Big, outfacing blooms in soft pastel shades are held well above the foliage, developing a greenish tinge as they mature. Leathery evergreen foliage displays a hint of silver. Perfect for dry shade and won't be bothered by deer. Blooms late winter through spring. From the breeding efforts of Belgian hellebore expert, Thierry van Paemel, and introduced by Plants Nouveau.

Helleborus × ericsmithii Winter Magic™ 'Candy Love'

Helleborus × nigercors Winter Magic™ 'Snow Love'

Lenten rose

Creamy white to yellow flowers fade to a celadon green as they mature over silvery evergreen foliage. Perfect for dry shade and won't be bothered by deer. Blooms late winter through spring. From the breeding efforts of Belgian hellebore expert, Thierry van Paemel, and introduced by Plants Nouveau.

Helleborus × nigercors Winter Magic™ 'Snow Love'

Heuchera americana 'Dale's Strain'

American alumroot

This is a seed propagated strain selected by Dale Hendricks that is really fantastic and excitingly variable. Unique silver-blue marbled foliage accented by white flowers on long panicles in the spring. Excellent drought tolerant ground cover. Foliage display is amazing!

Heuchera americana 'Dale's Strain'

Heuchera longiflora

Longflower alumroot

A beautiful display when used en masse, the long flowering stems of this alumroot sway high above deep green foliage mottled in silver highlights. Tubular calyces surround the pale yellow flowers and securely affix them to upright stems. Expect flowering from late May into June.

Heuchera longiflora

Heuchera macrorhiza 'Autumn Bride'

Heuchera macrorhiza 'Autumn Bride'

Alumroot

Fuzzy, chartreuse to lime green, nearly evergreen foliage erupts in September with white fountains of pure white flowers continuing until frost. A very easy-care plant tolerant of dry shade and a wide variety of conditions. A good, tough exciting meat-and-potatoes groundcover that doubles as a cut flower! Great for moist shade. Named and introduced by Bluemount Nurseries, Monkton, MD.

Heuchera macrorhiza 'Autumn Bride'

Hibiscus moscheutos

Hibiscus moscheutos

Swamp rosemallow

This shrublike herbaceous perennial is a vigorous grower with large, glabrous leaves and 4-5" wide flowers that range from pink to white. The flowers last only for one day, but they appear consistently until the end of the season. An amazing show of color and grace!

Hibiscus moscheutos

Iris versicolor

Blueflag
Very robust, dramatic display of boldly veined, swordlike leaves with large, violet-blue flowers accented by whitish markings at the base of the sepals. Petals and sepals spread out flat making it an attractive place for feeding by hummingbirds.
Iris versicolor

Juncus effusus

Soft rush
Juncus effusus is a clump forming wetland plant that is a striking vertical addition to any garden or container planting. Upright, fanning, deep green, rounded stems make a great accent in a container or water garden. Soft Rush can be planted at the edge of a pond or in up to 6" of standing water. Inconspicuous golden flowers appear atop the stems in summer. Native to most of North America, Soft Rush provides food and shelter for birds and other wildlife. Distribution Map
Juncus effusus

Juncus tenuis

Poverty rush

Great as a diminutive filler for rain gardens, as a groundcover, and for erosion control.

Juncus tenuis

Liatris spicata

Spike gayfeather

We are pleased to increase the availability of Pennsylvania provenance populations of our native gayfeathers. Tallest of the genus with upright spikes bearing pinkish-purple tassels in July and August. One of the best garden performers! An excellent cut flower and a magnet for butterflies, bees, rare moths and hummingbirds. Deer resistant!

Liatris spicata

Lobelia cardinalis

Lobelia cardinalis

Cardinal flower

Clump-forming habit with brilliant red flower spikes set against green and purple-bronze colored foliage. Each individual spike of scarlet flowers open from bottom to top and stays in bloom for several weeks. A favorite of hummingbirds. Makes an excellent cut flower. A real show stopper!

Lobelia cardinalis

Lobelia siphilitica

Great blue lobelia

The spikes of brilliant true blue flowers on this wetland native attract butterflies, hummingbirds and neighbors to your garden! Lobelia siphilitica provides outstanding color for the border, wet meadow or pond edge. Naturalizes easily in moist soils, but tolerates periods of drought.

Lobelia siphilitica

Lupinus perennis

Sundial lupine

Fragrant, pea-like, blue to violet flowers in late spring with leaves that are palmately divided into 7-11 leaflets. Enhances soil fertility by fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a useful form. Requires good drainage.

Lupinus perennis

Matteuccia struthiopteris

Ostrich fern
Large, lustrous, dark green fronds arch gracefully and give the tropical feel of a palm. Happiest in a cool moist site, it will tolerate more sun at the side of a stream or pond. Emerging fiddleheads are delectable sautéed in a bit of oil.
Matteuccia struthiopteris

Meehania cordata

Meehania cordata

Meehan's mint

Looking for a native substitute for Ajuga or Lamium? This could be it! Long, trailing stems run across the ground and root along the way. In late spring the green carpet gives way to hundreds of blue flowers opening to reveal spotted throats. Beautiful from a distance and under close scrutiny. Irresistible in a pot!

Meehania cordata

Mertensia virginica

Virginia bluebells

You know spring has arrived when the pendulous, trumpet-shaped flowers of Mertensia return. Flower buds start off pink and slowly transition to a soft blue as flowers develop. Foliage is smooth, oval, and has an attractive bluish cast. Beautiful when used en masse and left undisturbed. The perfect spring ephemeral for the woodland garden, incorporate with native ferns and sedges. Summer dormant. Best for planting directly into the landscape, as they must root in to return to bloom the following year. These ephemerals are not ideal for finishing in a pot for spring sales.

Mertensia virginica

Monarda bradburiana

Eastern beebalm

Tubular, two-lipped, pink to light lavender flowers carry a purple tracking and bloom from spring into summer. A member of the mint family, this native bee balm is very attractive to pollinators and occurs naturally in open and dry, rocky woods from Alabama to Texas, north to Iowa.

Monarda bradburiana

Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline'

Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline'

Beebalm

Named for the son of Georgia plantsman and garden designer Jean Cline. This is the ticket as far as mildew resistant Monardas. Wonderfully aromatic foliage and stems with enormous red tubular flowers from June to August. A Saul Nursery introduction. Cherished by butterflies and hummingbirds. Also makes an excellent cut flower!

Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline'

Monarda fistulosa

Wild bergamot

Lovely lavender flowers top aromatic foliage. Easy to grow in a perennial border, wildflower garden or meadow. Wild bergamot is a great naturalizing wildflower and a magnet for butterflies and hummingbirds. Monarda fistulosa is more tolerant of drought and resistant to powdery mildew than M. didyma.

Monarda fistulosa

Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace'

Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace'

Wild bergamot
This great plant was named by Mike and Barbara Bridges, of Southern Perennials and Herbs, for their daughter. Soft lavender pin cushion-like flowers. Quite mildew resistant, with excellent, shiny foliage. Extremely showy. A must for the avid butterfly gardener!
Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace'

Monarda punctata

Spotted beebalm

A valuable ecological species, Monarda punctata is the equivalent of a juice bar at the gym for nectar loving/needing insects! BONUS, it also resists all other kinds of mites that could impact the bees because it is incredibly high in thymol. If you are in the area where the endangered Karner Blue still resides, you will be helping restore them to safe status by planting a stand of Monarda punctata, as this is their food mothership.

Monarda punctata

Oenothera fruticosa

Sundrops

A tough and reliable perennial, well-suited to hot dry sites. The stems of Oenothera fruticosa are thin, hairy, and reddish with similar leaves. The buds begin as red but open into beautiful bright yellow flowers in early summer. Easy, dependable, a strong grower that can spread a bit, particularly in sandy soils. Great color for a meadow! Native to dry soil, open fields, and open woods from Nova Scotia to Florida.

Oenothera fruticosa

Oenothera fruticosa 'Fireworks'

Oenothera fruticosa 'Fireworks'

Sundrops
Confused for many years in the trade, we are proud to carry the true 'Fireworks'. Deep bronze foliage and red stems are contrasted by red buds opening to canary yellow blooms in June. The individual flowers may not last for more than a day or two, but they open in succession leaving the plant in continuous bloom. Burgundy rosettes in winter. More compact and darker than 'Summer Solstice'. The most popular cultivar of the Oenotheras!
Oenothera fruticosa 'Fireworks'

Onoclea sensibilis

Sensitive fern
A freely running, deciduous fern with broad, deeply pinnatifid, smooth leaves. It spreads in moist soil and stays low to the ground, usually not more than 12-18", though heights of up to 3' are possible in ideal conditions. Very effective as a moist shade groundcover.
Onoclea sensibilis

Osmunda cinnamomea

Osmunda cinnamomea

Cinnamon fern
Brilliant green lacy fronds gracefully arch outward in stately vase-shaped clumps. In early summer narrow fronds emerge as vertical spikes of cinnamon red brown in the center. Especially striking when planted in groups. Prefers a moist shady site, but tolerates more sun in cooler zones.
Osmunda cinnamomea

Osmunda claytoniana

Interrupted fern

Broad green fronds are “interrupted” in the middle by spore-bearing pinnae (leaflets) in early summer, hence the common name. Forming a lovely spreading vase habit, this low-maintenance native fern makes a distinctive addition to the shade border or woodland garden.

Osmunda claytoniana

Osmunda regalis var. spectabilis

Royal fern
Royal fern is truly one of the most distinctive and spectacular bold-textured deciduous native ferns with its light green, leathery leaves and graceful architectural stature. With adequate moisture, royal fern can reach 6' tall and create a lush, tropical feel along a stream or beside a pond.
Osmunda regalis var. spectabilis

Pachysandra procumbens

Allegheny spurge

Why plant English Ivy, Vinca or Liriope when you can enjoy this native evergreen gem? Fragrant, white flower spikes appear in spring, later becoming camouflaged by a new flush of gorgeous, crisp green foliage. Leaves have a scalloped margin and take on an attractive pale silver mottling.

Pachysandra procumbens

Packera aurea

Golden groundsel

Clusters of small golden daisy-like flowers appear over broad, shiny green, toothed basal leaves in May. Strong blooming, even in the shade. A robust groundcover where happy and an excellent cut flower. Self seeds and naturalizes.

Packera aurea

Panicum 'Cape Breeze'

Switchgrass

North Creek is proud to bring Panicum 'Cape Breeze' to the market. Fantastic foliage stays green until Halloween! From production to the landscape, this grass truly is a breeze. Selected for upright habit, compact size and early flowering. Its perfect, tidy stature combines the toughness of seaside Panicum with the neatness of garden worthy cultivars. Great texture and movement in the landscape!

Panicum 'Cape Breeze'

Panicum amarum 'Dewey Blue'

Switchgrass

This smooth, blue tinted grass can grow as tall as 4' and spreads slowly through its rhizome growth forming clumps. It was selected for its glaucous blue color, and graceful fountain habit. The flowers are airy, emerging in the fall, and persisting as a light beige color throughout the winter. Selected and named, by Rick Darke, for the lower Delaware beach town that bears its name. Native along the shores from Louisiana to Connecticut. It is adapted to dry, sterile locations where it plays an important role in stabilizing.

Panicum amarum 'Dewey Blue'

Panicum virgatum

Switchgrass
An upright landscape grass with lovely blue green foliage that turns yellow in fall. In late summer airy wheat-colored flowers appear and remain attractive well into fall. It is an undemanding native grass suitable to any soil type. Tough and easy to grow!
Panicum virgatum

Panicum virgatum 'Northwind'

Switchgrass
Wow! An unequivocally upright steel blue panicum selected by Roy Diblik of Northwind Perennial Farm in Springfield, WI. It was the only one of our 13 trial varieties still standing after Hurricane Floyd! And the drought of '99? No problem. Wide, thick leaf blades are a bit more substantial than those of the other blues. A golden yellow color in the fall.
Panicum virgatum 'Northwind'

Panicum virgatum 'Shenandoah'

Switchgrass
The brightest red Panicum by a long shot. Experienced horticulturalists have mistaken it for Imperata at first glance. It colors up by June and the flowers are also red. The shortest of the group and also the slowest grower, perhaps due in part to its lack of chlorophyll. This will probably be the most popular Switchgrass ever! Introduced by Dr. Hans Simon of Germany. Nothing comes close to the fall color displayed by this grass!
Panicum virgatum 'Shenandoah'

Penstemon digitalis

Beardtongue

In early summer, white or light-pink-tinted, tubular 1" flowers on branching, hollow stalks rise above a basal rosette of lustrous dark green leaves. Drought tolerant, tough as nails, and deer resistant. The tubular flowers make an excellent landing pad for bees, butterflies and hummingbirds alike!

Penstemon digitalis

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red'

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red'

Beardtongue

This native makes a stunning display with its brilliant white flowers against a backdrop of deep red foliage. Tough and easy to grow, it tolerates a wide variety of conditions including hot, dry sites. Our plants are now vegetatively propagated from our reddest, most vigorous selections.

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red'

Phegopteris decursive-pinnata

Japanese beech fern

Japanese Beech Fern is one of the best landscape ferns we've tried over the years. It also behaves very well in pot culture and it travels well with minimal breakage. It has been in the trade for some time, but is still underutilized since it hasn't been readily available. No more! Phegopteris decursive-pinnata is a vigorous spreader and an excellent choice for a groundcover. Beautiful, with graceful fronds, it produces large colonies in moist or average shade. Its vigorous growth is produced on short runners so it is easily controlled if necessary. Arching fronds are a lustrous dark green and have a lighter green underside for a unique display. Japanese Beech Fern appreciates a little extra moisture in the soil to perform best, although it is not necessary for plant health and appearance. It may be evergreen in warmer zones and is fully perennial to zone 4.

Phegopteris decursive-pinnata

Phlox divaricata 'Blue Moon'

Woodland phlox

Selected for outstanding flower color and very full flower petals, 'Blue Moon' bears many fragrant, 5-petaled flowers with the arrival of spring. Enjoy a knee-high sea of elegant, violet-blue flowers that attract hummingbirds & butterflies to your garden. Foliage is lance shaped and medium green. A long-lived, carefree native groundcover.

Phlox divaricata 'Blue Moon'

Phlox paniculata 'Jeana'

Garden phlox

Found by and named after Jeana Prewitt of Nashville, TN, this selection possesses outstanding mildew resistance with varying shades of sweetly scented, lavender-pink flowers, vibrant midsummer through early autumn. Foliage remains clean green while flower clusters create a tiered effect along upright, multi-stemmed branches. Expect a flurry of pollinator activity!

Phlox paniculata 'Jeana'

Phlox stolonifera 'Sherwood Purple'

Phlox stolonifera 'Sherwood Purple'

Creeping phlox

Mat-forming habit with masses of star-like, clear purple flowers with deep green foliage. A beautifully vibrant groundcover that will bring excitement to the shade or woodland garden!

Phlox stolonifera 'Sherwood Purple'

Physostegia virginiana 'Miss Manners'

Physostegia virginiana 'Miss Manners'

Obedient plant

This plant was selected by Darrell Probst of Garden Visions in Hubbardston, MA. 'Miss Manners' is notable for its well-behaved, non spreading habit. It is a compact, clumping form, with excellent secondary branching and good rebloom. Pure white snapdragon-like flowers from June to September over deep green, glossy foliage. A nice late season addition to the garden for bees and hummingbirds.

Physostegia virginiana 'Miss Manners'

Physostegia virginiana 'Pink Manners'

Obedient plant

Tubular flowers in shades of lavender-pink adorn this taller sport of 'Miss Manners' from midsummer through autumn. As expected, it holds an upright, clump forming habit with attractive medium green foliage and grows to about 36” tall and 20” wide. An adaptable and easy-to-grow native, the strong stems do not require staking.

Physostegia virginiana 'Pink Manners'

Polemonium reptans 'Stairway to Heaven'

Polemonium reptans 'Stairway to Heaven'

creeping Jacob's ladder

This excellent variegated selection of P. reptans was selected by Bill Cullina of The New England Wild Flower Society. A good plant for shade or a sunny edge (with adequate moisture). Imagine, a variegated Polemonium that actually lives! This native groundcover is very popular, and its royalties benefit the Garden in the Woods and their plant and habitat conservation.

Polemonium reptans 'Stairway to Heaven'

Polemonium reptans

creeping Jacob's ladder

A free-flowering woodland native with delicate light blue flowers topping ladder-like foliage in late spring. A good light-textured groundcover in areas with average to moist soils.

Polemonium reptans

Polystichum acrostichoides

Polystichum acrostichoides

Christmas fern

While not as showy as some others, this fern makes up for it with its neat habit, easy culture, and its lustrous, nearly evergreen leaves. Often used in Christmas floral arrangements because it is still attractive in December. It is a wonderful companion for spring blooming bulbs. Found in acidic to neutral soils on shaded slopes and well drained flats.

Polystichum acrostichoides

Polystichum polyblepharum

Korean tasselfern

Meaning "many eyelashes" polyblepharum describes the fuzzy stems of this glossy deep green garden fern. Dependable and hardy, it lends elegance to the shade border and combines well with Carex, Heuchera and other ferns. Evergreen in warmer zones.

Polystichum polyblepharum

Porteranthus trifoliatus

Bowman's root

Also known as Indian Physic or American Ipecac, Bowman's Root is an easy-to-grow native for bright shade or partial sun and it tolerates tree root competition well as long at it has a nice layer of organic mulch. Bowman's Root is lovely in a mass planting where its lacy white flowers can shimmer in a light breeze. It makes a nice filler - think Gaura for shade! A compact, rounded plant is topped in late spring with ethereal white flowers growing in a few loose terminal panicles, with red petioles and mahogany stems. Clean, disease-free foliage often turns deep bronzy red in fall and contrasts beautifully with the more typical oranges and yellows in the perennial border. Interesting form and unique seed heads persist into winter. Great for cut flowers!

Porteranthus trifoliatus

Porteranthus trifoliatus 'Pink Profusion'

Bowman's root

We've been enjoying this great native for many years in our garden, since it was given to us by the Mt. Cuba Center in 2001. 'Pink Profusion' has clear pink flowers that are held daintily above reddish leaves on deep red stems. The best part is the way the flowers shimmer in a light breeze, as though they will take flight at any moment.

Porteranthus trifoliatus 'Pink Profusion'

Pycnanthemum flexuosum

Appalachian mountain mint

An aromatic, summer blooming, herbaceous perennial that produces silvery white, globular flowers on sturdy, upright stems. Blooming over a long period, flowers are prominently displayed above clean green foliage from summer into fall. A good soil stabilizer, this species spreads moderately via underground stem. Foliage develops an attractive red tinge in autumn. A larval host plant for the Gray Hairstreak Butterfly. Incorporate along the perennial border, rain garden, or near the vegetable garden to entice pollinators.

Pycnanthemum flexuosum

Pycnanthemum muticum

Short-toothed mountain mint

We give up! So many of you claimed this mountain mint to be superior to Pycnanthemum virginianum that we decided to try it for ourselves. We love it! Its leaves are broader and more lustrous, the bracts are silvery and very showy, the flowers are pinkish and its habit is more compact. Nicely aromatic. This native is happiest at the wood's edge, so it is an excellent for a naturalized border or woodland garden. Mountain Mint is one of the best nectar sources for native butterflies, so butterfly gardeners can't do without this one. Our bees go crazy for it, too!

Pycnanthemum muticum

Ratibita pinnata

Prairie coneflower

Brown cones with reflexed yellow ray petals adorn this midwestern prairie native in midsummer. Emits a soft fragrance of anise when seeds are crushed. Long-lived and very easy to grow in most situations. Great for attracting birds and butterflies! Combines well with meadow grasses and flowers. Makes a wonderful cut flower, too!

Ratibita pinnata

Rubus calycinoides

Creeping raspberry

An irresistible quilt-textured, creeping groundcover! Turns deep, vivid red in the fall. Small (1-1.5") deep green, maple-shaped leaves with smooth, light tan undersides. Nearly evergreen for year-round interest. Insect and pest free. White flowers with amber fruits in late spring. Very durable!

Rubus calycinoides

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm'

Black-eyed Susan

A garden classic with bold texture and upright habit. Bright gold petals with a deep brown cone highlight the garden in late summer. Each flower may last up to two weeks! Makes a wonderful and long lasting cut flower. Provides seeds in the winter for birds and nectar for butterflies. Beautiful and versatile, outstanding in mass plantings as well as perennial borders, meadows and prairie gardens.

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm'

Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida

Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida

Black-eyed Susan

Shiny, deep green foliage. Smaller and finer than Rudbeckia 'Goldsturm' with 10 weeks of flowers from July into October. Six weeks after 'Goldsturm' is brown, this plant is at its peak! Excellent cut flower. Provides late summer nectar for butterfliers and seeds in the winter for birds. Beautiful and versatile!

Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida

Rudbeckia lacinata

Cutleaf coneflower

This coneflower is a tall, erect and stately native with yellow ray petals accented by a green center held by coarse, hairy stems. Blooms in August and September. Excellent cut flower and butterfly magnet. R. laciniata can be found blooming in moist meadows, grassy roadsides and flood plains from Quebec to Montana south to Arizona and Florida.

Rudbeckia lacinata

Rudbeckia lacinata 'Autumn Sun'

Cutleaf coneflower

This long-blooming butterfly (especially monarch) magnet has large, glossy, deep green, deeply cut leaves along the stems and loose clusters of clear yellow ray flowers with large green cones that darken with age. Blooms for 8+ weeks in mid to late summer. Very cold hardy.

Rudbeckia lacinata 'Autumn Sun'

Rudbeckia maxima

Great coneflower

Huge powder-blue leaves make up 2' to 3' of basal foliage that is effective all during the growing season. In June and July, towering flower spikes explode with large, deep gold, drooping ray flowers with a black center. A must-have for the butterfly and bird lover! Reliable and deer proof.

Rudbeckia maxima

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers'

Sweet coneflower

Our friend Larry Lowman of Ridgecrest Nursery in Wynne, Arkansas graciously gave us this marvelous plant. It was collected from a railroad prairie remnant in southern Illinois and named for the man who found it, Henry Eilers, a horticulturist and retired nurseryman. Basal leaves appear in early spring and flowering stalks begin their ascent in June, reaching five to six feet and full flower by August, often staying in bloom into September. 'Henry Eilers' has finely quilled flowers of true yellow, not gold, and is stunning in a mass planting. It has captivated many visitors who have seen it here and motivated them to ask us to grow it. The leaves of Rudbeckia subtomentosa are sweetly scented with a subtle vanilla fragrance. It is lovely with Joe-Pyes and grasses, and it blooms with the Hibiscus hybrids and makes a great companion for them as well. 'Henry Eilers' has undeniable potential as a cut flower with its unique appearance, sturdy straight stems and long vase life.

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers'

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Little Henry'

Sweet coneflower

The most darling little selection of native sweet coneflower you'll ever see! This is a third shorter than 'Henry Eilers'; the height has great appeal, but it is the unique petals that draw the most attention. Surrounding the traditional brown-eyed Susan cones are narrow quills that jet out all around it. A wonderfully compact, upright and vigorous introduction from Terra Nova.

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Little Henry'

Rudbeckia triloba

Rudbeckia triloba

Three-lobed coneflower

Hundreds of small, deep gold flowers bloom July through October! A naturalizing self seeder. Biennial or short-lived perennial. Georgia Gold Medal Winner in 1997. Three-lobed coneflower is very drought, heat and pest tolerant. Prized by butterfly and hummingbird gardeners.

Rudbeckia triloba

Ruellia humilis

Wild petunia

A drought-tolerant prairie native with delightful lavender-blue petunia-like flowers that bloom from summer to fall. Compact (great in pots!) and very easy to grow. Seeds in well. Great choice for a height-restricted meadow. Found in dry open woods and prairies Pennsylvania to Indiana, south to Alabama.

Ruellia humilis

Schizachyrium scoparium

Little bluestem
An upright and clump forming native grass with spiky blades of blue or green. Wispy silvery flowers occur in late summer, followed by a spectacular display of fall color changing from green and orange to deep burgundy. Remains attractive as an architectural feature through winter.
Schizachyrium scoparium

Schizachyrium scoparium 'Standing Ovation'

Little bluestem

A warm season grass that does well in poor, dry soils.  Spikey bluish-green stems and leaves transition to a sizzling display of oranges, reds, yellows, and purplish-browns in the autumn.  Also provides winter interest before cutting back in early spring to make way for new growth.

Schizachyrium scoparium 'Standing Ovation'

Scirpus cyperinus

Wool grass
A large, upright marsh grass with attractive wooly inflorescences that turn coppery in late summer and persist into winter.
Scirpus cyperinus

Scirpus validus

Soft-stemmed bulrush

Obligate wetland plant for inland shallow waters, non-tidal marshes and wildlife. Large triangular dark green stems with brownish inflorescences hang pendulously from spring to fall. Stems are unusually spongy. Emergent aquatic.

Scirpus validus

Scutellaria incana

Hoary skullcap
An eastern meadow native that provides weeks of color in mid-summer. Purple flowers top bushy green plants. Found at wood's edge and in sunny meadows from New York to Arkansas.
Scutellaria incana

Sedum ternatum 'Larinem Park'

Sedum ternatum 'Larinem Park'

Stonecrop

A low-growing, succulent native groundcover for shade, it carpets the woodland floor with whimsical round leaves arranged in threes. In spring it is covered in white star-shaped flowers. A slowly spreading, floriferous selection from Mineral County, WV, via The Primrose Path of Scottdale, PA. 'Larinem Park' is more tolerant of shade and moisture than other Sedum species.

Sedum ternatum 'Larinem Park'

Solidago 'Solar Cascade'

Goldenrod

Delightful, golden-yellow flowers are borne in axillary clusters along reflexing stems from late summer into fall. Reliable, deep green, glossy foliage remains clean throughout the growing seasons. Not an aggressive runner, 'Solar Cascade' is a clump forming perennial reaching knee height, maxing out somewhere between the taller 'Fireworks' and more compact 'Golden Fleece'. Performs best in moist to average garden soil under full sun or partial shade; extremely drought tolerant once established. This great garden plant is easy to propagate and proved to be a standout in The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden perennial trials. Plant en masse for a dramatic effect or incorporate into seasonal arrangements.

Solidago 'Solar Cascade'

Solidago caesia

Bluestem goldenrod

This clump forming, non-invasive native perennial boldly displays arching wands of golden clusters in September, contrasted by blue-green stems. Adds life to a dry shady spot. Great with Aster cordifolius and Chasmanthium. Incredible butterfly magnet and cut flower!

Solidago caesia

Solidago graminifolia

Grass-leaved goldenrod

Fine-textured linear foliage and golden flat-topped inflorescences in late summer. Cherished by butterflies and preying mantises and well as the wildflower enthusiast.

Solidago graminifolia

Solidago odora

Anisescented goldenrod

Wonderfully fragrant leaves give off an anise scent when crushed, reminiscent of licorice candy! The lance-shaped leaves are a glossy, smooth dark green. S. odora has a tidy, clump-forming habit and is not weedy or aggressive in the garden. Attracts butterflies, bees, ladybugs, lacewings and other beneficial insects. Its high ecologial value and handsome appearance make it a valuable addition to wildflower gardens, meadows and naturalistic borders.

Solidago odora

Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'

Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'

Goldenrod

A compact, cascading, clump-forming native cultivar with a radiating flower form that really looks like fireworks! A great addition for late season color and to lure the butterflies in. Selected and named by Ken Moore of North Carolina Botanical Garden in 1970. Introduced by Niche Gardens.

Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'

Solidago sempervirens

Seaside goldenrod

An east coast native that is useful for dune restoration projects, stormwater management, roadside, and habitat plantings.

Solidago sempervirens

Sorghastrum nutans

Sorghastrum nutans

Indiangrass
A vigorous native warm season grass with bluish green foliage turning a translucent yellow-deep gold fall color and bearing beautiful panicles of copper. Excellent for cut flowers.
Sorghastrum nutans

Spigelia marilandica

Indian pink

One of the most striking and beautiful of our native perennials, Indian pink's summer flowers are brilliant red and tubular with canary yellow throats. A very hardy plant, though it is best planted by the end of July for reliable success in gardens and containers. A favorite of butterflies and hummingbirds, it is at home in the bright woodland or shaded border.

Spigelia marilandica

Sporobolus heterolepis

Sporobolus heterolepis

Prairie dropseed

According to wild Niel Dibol, of Prairie Nursery, Westfield, WI, it is "often considered to be the most handsome of the prairie grasses. It makes a well defined and very distinctive border." Fine textured, deep green foliage with lovely, light and airy flowers to 2 1/2" in September and October. Flowers have a slight fragrance similar to coriander. Often has glowing pumpkin orange fall color. Good drought tolerance.

Sporobolus heterolepis

Stylophorum diphyllum

Celandine poppy

Brilliant yellow flowers bloom in spring atop blue-green, pinnately lobed foliage. Leaf underside has a silvery cast. An easy to grow native that will self sow and form a dense shade groundcover. Tolerates all but the driest conditions. Beautiful with Virginia Bluebells, Columbine, Goats Beard, Wild Ginger and Woodland Phlox.

Stylophorum diphyllum

Thermopsis caroliniana

Carolina Lupine

Clump-forming perennial with dense spikes of sulphur yellow in June resemble Baptista or lupines. Clean, compound foliage is attractive late into the season. Very durable and long lived once established. Beautiful cut flower.

Thermopsis caroliniana

Tiarella cordifolia

Foamflower
Foamflowers are commonly found in the woods of eastern North America, but not nearly often enough in gardens. They are easy to grow and many will spread when given moist soil high in organic matter and shade. In the early spring fairy wand flowers of white or light pink appear over heuchera-like green, deeply veined leaves which are often tinged with burgundy.
Tiarella cordifolia

Tiarella cordifolia 'Brandywine'

Foamflower

Our friends from Sinclair (The Pharoah of Foamflowers) Adam Dunvegan Nursery, this is rated as one of the most vigorous of the genus. A strong grower with glossy, rugose leaves and excellent bronze fall and winter color. Bold, creamy white flowers persist for 6 to 8 weeks, a robust clump former with some short runners in spring and fall. Height: 8-12 inches (not in flower); 12-18 (in flower)

Tiarella cordifolia 'Brandywine'

Tiarella cordifolia 'Running Tapestry'

Tiarella cordifolia 'Running Tapestry'

Foamflower
A vigorous running groundcover with red speckled, deeply dissected heart shaped foliage, Tirella Running Tapestry produces a plethora of white flower spikes in Spring. Discovered by Jim Plyler of Natural Landscapes Nursery, West Grove. PA, the irrepressible grower of native trees and shrubs. A Cornell University All Star Groundcover!
Tiarella cordifolia 'Running Tapestry'

Tiarella cordifolia var. collina 'Oakleaf'

Heartleaf foamflower
One of the first and still one of the best of the new generation of foamflowers. A very long blooming, clumping plant with wonderfully shaped leaves, light pink flowers and bronze new spring growth. Brilliant burgundy winter color. A shared introduction from the University of Delaware, the Brandywine Conservancy and Dunvegan Nursery.
Tiarella cordifolia var. collina 'Oakleaf'

Tradescantia ohiensis

Spiderwort
This Spiderwort of Pennsylvania provenance is a great landscape plant for hot sunny locations, unlike others in the genus. Attractive bluish-grey foliage with flowers in blue, pink or purple from early June to September. Think of a flowering grass-like, drought-loving native perennial.
Tradescantia ohiensis

Verbena hastata

Blue vervain
The tall thin spikes of Blue Vervain grace the wet meadows of the US in July and August. Verbena hastata is a short-lived perennial that readily self sows where happy. A great plant for pond's edge where it seeds in between sedges and rushes and cheerfully holds its own.
Verbena hastata

Vernonia glauca

Upland ironweed
A native Pennsylvania plant that is happy in ordinary to dry spots. A bit shorter than V. noveboracensis, and much more adaptable to average garden conditions. Deep purple loose upright flower clusters in August and September are attractive to people and butterflies. Help us make it less rare!
Vernonia glauca

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Ironweed

This selection of the Arkansas native comes to us from Dr. Allan Armitage's trials at the University of Georgia. It has lovely fine foliage like Amsonia hubrichtii and is a compact, well-branched and vigorous plant. In late summer it is covered with true purple flowers that attract plenty of butterflies. Found in rocky flood plains, Vernonia lettermannii is very tolerant of hot dry locations, yet can withstand brief periods of inundation.

Vernonia lettermannii 'Iron Butterfly'

Vernonia noveboracensis

New York ironweed
Deep purple haze in damp meadows, roadsides and pastures. A lovely native that adapts well to any moist location.
Vernonia noveboracensis

Veronicastrum virginicum

Veronicastrum virginicum

Culver's root

Big dramatic spikes of white Veronica-like flowers in July and August. Very tough and long-lasting once established. Found in open woods, moist meadows, and praries east of the Rockies.

Veronicastrum virginicum

Viola walteri 'Silver Gem'

Prostrate blue violet

From the gardens of Mt. Cuba Center, North Creek is delighted to introduce this tough native groundcover. Easily identified by trailing stems and delicate lavender flowers, 'Silver Gem' forms a dense, tidy mat of attractive silver foliage. Flowers appear in March and persist into autumn. Our plant trials have proven 'Silver Gem' to be exceptionally drought tolerant and happiest in part to full shade. Pot in quarts or gallons for early spring sales.

 

Viola walteri 'Silver Gem'

Woodwardia virginica

Virginia chain fern
Virginia Chain Fern is a great native landscaping fern for those tough areas with moist or saturated soils. Spreading quickly, it provides a dense, weed-resistant groundcover in damp sites or sunny pond edges. It also is beautiful, and less assertive, in average garden conditions.
Woodwardia virginica

Zizia aurea

Golden Alexanders

Golden clusters of 3-4" umbels in May and June. Deep green, leathery, handsomely divided basal foliage. Native to wooded bottomlands, stream banks, moist meadows, and floodplains east of the Rockies. Very attractive to butterflies.

Zizia aurea