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Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL

Meehania cordata

Meehan's mint

Looking for a native substitute for Ajuga or Lamium? This could be it! Long, trailing stems run across the ground and root along the way. In late spring the green carpet gives way to hundreds of blue flowers opening to reveal spotted throats. Beautiful from a distance and under close scrutiny. Irresistible in a pot!

Meehania cordata

Mertensia virginica

Virginia bluebells

You know spring has arrived when the pendulous, trumpet-shaped flowers of Mertensia return. Flower buds start off pink and slowly transition to a soft blue as flowers develop. Foliage is smooth, oval, and has an attractive bluish cast. Beautiful when used en masse and left undisturbed. The perfect spring ephemeral for the woodland garden, incorporate with native ferns and sedges. Summer dormant. Best for planting directly into the landscape, as they must root in to return to bloom the following year. These ephemerals are not ideal for finishing in a pot for spring sales.

Mertensia virginica

Monarda 'Petite Delight'

Beebalm

Bred by Lynn Collicutt of the Morden Research Station in Morden, Manitoba. Lavender-pink flowers in July and August atop deep green, shiny and clean foliage. More compact than others in the species. Very low maintenance. Cherished by butterflies and hummingbirds, but loathed by deer. Also makes an excellent cut flower!

Monarda 'Petite Delight'

Monarda 'Raspberry Wine'

Beebalm

A White Flower Farm introduction. The buds really do resemble raspberries! Clear wine-red flowers from June through August. Very mildew resistant. Cherished by butterflies and hummingbirds, but loathed by deer. Also makes an excellent cut flower.

Monarda 'Raspberry Wine'

Monarda bradburiana

Eastern beebalm

Tubular, two-lipped, pink to light lavender flowers carry a purple tracking and bloom from spring into summer. A member of the mint family, this native bee balm is very attractive to pollinators and occurs naturally in open and dry, rocky woods from Alabama to Texas, north to Iowa.

Monarda bradburiana

Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline'

Beebalm

Named for the son of Georgia plantsman and garden designer Jean Cline. This is the ticket as far as mildew resistant Monardas. Wonderfully aromatic foliage and stems with enormous red tubular flowers from June to August. A Saul Nursery introduction. Cherished by butterflies and hummingbirds. Also makes an excellent cut flower!

Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline'

Monarda fistulosa

Wild bergamot

Lovely lavender flowers top aromatic foliage. Easy to grow in a perennial border, wildflower garden or meadow. Wild bergamot is a great naturalizing wildflower and a magnet for butterflies and hummingbirds. Monarda fistulosa is more tolerant of drought and resistant to powdery mildew than M. didyma.

Monarda fistulosa

Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace'

Wild bergamot
This great plant was named by Mike and Barbara Bridges, of Southern Perennials and Herbs, for their daughter. Soft lavender pin cushion-like flowers. Quite mildew resistant, with excellent, shiny foliage. Extremely showy. A must for the avid butterfly gardener!
Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace'

Monarda punctata

Spotted beebalm

A valuable ecological species, Monarda punctata is the equivalent of a juice bar at the gym for nectar loving/needing insects! BONUS, it also resists all other kinds of mites that could impact the bees because it is incredibly high in thymol. If you are in the area where the endangered Karner Blue still resides, you will be helping restore them to safe status by planting a stand of Monarda punctata, as this is their food mothership.

Monarda punctata

Nepeta 'Early Bird'

Catnip

The earliest blooming Nepeta we've had in our trials, with flowers starting in early April and lasting up to six weeks! Clean, aromatic foliage and a compact habit make it an excellent groundcover.

Nepeta 'Early Bird'

Nepeta Junior Walker™ 'Novanepjun'

Catnip

The non-reseeding progeny of 'Walker's Low'. This low-growing, compact catmint packs a punch of lavender-blue flowers from late spring through summer over aromatic blue-green foliage. Its tidy habit is ideal for mixed containers, the perennial border, and along paths and walkways. A Star Roses & Plants introduction.

Nepeta Junior Walker™ 'Novanepjun'

Nepeta × faassenii 'Walker's Low'

Catmint

Soft, fragrant, gray-green foliage with sprays of large, distinct bluish purple flowers from April to October. Compact, prolific and beautiful! Named for English garden Walker's Low.

Nepeta × faassenii 'Walker's Low'

Oenothera berlanderi 'Siskiyou'

Evening primrose

An extremely long blooming, easy care plant. A vigorous, stoloniferous grower that can be a bit of a thug, especially in sandier soils. It is less invasive and shorter than O. speciosa, but still a fast running plant that can quickly spread. Great numbers of 1-1/2", upright, clear light pink flowers are translucent in the sun. Blooms May through July and with periodic rebloom until October.

Oenothera berlanderi 'Siskiyou'

Oenothera fruticosa

Sundrops

A tough and reliable perennial, well-suited to hot dry sites. The stems of Oenothera fruticosa are thin, hairy, and reddish with similar leaves. The buds begin as red but open into beautiful bright yellow flowers in early summer. Easy, dependable, a strong grower that can spread a bit, particularly in sandy soils. Great color for a meadow! Native to dry soil, open fields, and open woods from Nova Scotia to Florida.

Oenothera fruticosa

Oenothera fruticosa 'Fireworks'

Sundrops
Confused for many years in the trade, we are proud to carry the true 'Fireworks'. Deep bronze foliage and red stems are contrasted by red buds opening to canary yellow blooms in June. The individual flowers may not last for more than a day or two, but they open in succession leaving the plant in continuous bloom. Burgundy rosettes in winter. More compact and darker than 'Summer Solstice'. The most popular cultivar of the Oenotheras!
Oenothera fruticosa 'Fireworks'
Botanical Name     Common Name
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