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Landscape Plugs™

NEW SIZE!  Learn more about the LP50 plug here.

Our best low-maintenance native perennials and grasses are available in plugs designed to be planted directly in the ground. We offer a wide selection of Eastern US natives and their cultivars selected for beauty and durability. Two sizes are available for direct planting: deep LP50 plugs are 5 inches deep by 2 inches square and come 50 to a standard nursery tray. Many shallow-rooted plants are available in flats of 32 (3" by 2.5" square) and are also suited to planting in the ground. Our Landscape Plugs™ offer an exciting alternative for quick establishment of plants in landscapes and containers.

Plant Selection
We are very selective in our choices for the Landscape Plugs™ program so that your planting gets off to a great start. All plants in our plug program are native to the midatlantic states, well suited to this climate and tolerant of drought and extreme temperature fluctuations. Robust root systems make for quick establishment and less initial watering. Plants purchased in spring are vernalized and ready to grow.

Why Use Landscape Plugs™?

  • Plants usually reach flowering size in first season and have a high transplant success rate.
  • Quicker and more reliable than seed, with erosion control starting in weeks rather than months.
  • LP50 plugs have deep (5") roots that establish quickly.
  • Compact size is easy to transport - a real cost saver.
  • Plants are chosen for wide adaptability and ease of transplanting and establishment.
  • Excellent choices for wildlife habitat development, providing food & shelter for many species.
  • Plugs come in flats made of 100% recycled plastic and are #6 recyclable.

Many thanks to the Biota of North America Program (BONAP) for the use of their North American Plant Atlas species distribution maps, which can be found on each native Landscape Plug™ species page. Click the map image to enlarge and view the plant's distribution status by county via link to the BONAP site. All map images are courtesy: Kartesz, J.T., The Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2013. Taxonomic Data Center. (http://www.bonap.net/tdc). Chapel Hill, N.C. [maps generated from Kartesz, J.T. 2013. Floristic Synthesis of North America, Version 1.0. Biota of North America Program (BONAP). (in press)] 

Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL

Acorus americanus

Sweetflag
Acorus americanus is a hardy perennial swamp or bog plant with sweet, spicy-scented leaves. Spadix like flowers appear in June and July, followed by dark berries. Found at water's edge from Nova Scotia to Virginia to Washington to Alaska. Great for stabilizing pond edges or filling a boggy area.
Acorus americanus

Actaea pachypoda 'Misty Blue'

White baneberry

White baneberry is a striking, multi-stemmed woodland perennial selected for soft, bluish-green, finely cut foliage. Flowers appear in spring, followed by vivid, reddish pedicels which produce large, white ‘doll’s eyes’ fruit in autumn, persisting for 4-6 weeks. Fruit is marked by a distinct black dot. This cultivar was discovered in a planting of unknown origin at Mt. Cuba Center in Greenville, Delaware.

Mt. Cuba Center is a non-profit organization committed to promoting and appreciation for plants native to the Piedmont, encouraging their use in gardens and supporting their conservation in nature. Tours, educational programs and plant introductions provide a means for future generations to gain an appreciation of the diversity and landscape potential of plants that comprise the Piedmont flora. 

Actaea pachypoda 'Misty Blue'

Adiantum pedatum

northern maidenhair

Dainty bright green fronds are held aloft on shiny black stems creating a light, airy texture in the woodland garden. In rich soil and bright shade it will spread by shallow rhizomes to form a dense groundcover. Found in the humus-rich woodlands and moist woods of Eastern North America. Easy to grow as long as the soil is loose and rich.

Adiantum pedatum

Agastache foeniculum

Anise hyssop

An upright, clump-forming perennial native to parts of the upper Midwest and Great Plains region. Lavender to purple flowers are densely packed along showy, cylindrical, terminal spikes mid to late summer. Medium green, lanceolate foliage remains clean throughout the season and carries a refreshing anise scent, attracting hummingbirds and butterflies.

Agastache foeniculum

Allium cernuum

Nodding onion
Found on ledges, in dry meadows, gravel, rocky or wooded slopes, this delicate onion has gently nodding pink flowers in late spring. Beautiful in the garden or naturalized in a meadow. Easy, dependable and very drought tolerant once established.
Allium cernuum

Amsonia 'Blue Ice'

Bluestar
This long-blooming, compact Amsonia selected from A. tabernaemontana seedlings at White Flower Farm is possibly a hybrid with the taxonomically challenged A. montana or perhaps with the Asian Rhazya orientale. Whatever its parentage, Blue Ice blooms longer and stronger than the species and forms a dense, compact mound of dark green leaves that turn brilliant yellow in the fall. Looks fantastic in a gallon!
Amsonia 'Blue Ice'

Amsonia hubrichtii

Threadleaf bluestar
A graceful and long lived native plant with very fine foliage, clusters of steel blue flowers in May and June on an upright, bushy plant. Excellent golden fall color. Thrives in full sun or part shade. No insect or pest problems with these babies. Found in Arkansas in 1942 by Leslie Hubricht.
Amsonia hubrichtii

Andropogon gerardii

Big bluestem
The king of native grasses, Big Bluestem has handsome gray to blue-green stems in spring turning to green alternating with deep red in summer then to coppery red in fall. Three fingered seed heads top tall stems in August. Clump forming with excellent drought tolerance once established. Andropogon gerardii can be found in moist meadows and along side roads and rivers from Canada to Mexico.
Andropogon gerardii

Andropogon glomeratus

Bushy beardgrass

Flowers emerge in September, enclosed in densely clustered bushy bracts atop stiffly upright stems. Green summer foliage transitions to an attractive copper-orange in autumn. Happiest in wet conditions such as bogs, marshes, swamps, swales and other low, moist ground. Multiple seasons of interest; use in cut flower arrangements.

Andropogon glomeratus

Andropogon virginicus

Broomsedge

An easy-to-grow clump forming native warm season grass with incredible golden copper fall color. A pioneer soil stabilizing plant that does well in poor, infertile areas and surprisingly in floodplains. It's wonderful for xeriscaping, in coastal areas, fall and winter cut stems and restoration.

Andropogon virginicus

Aquilegia canadensis

Wild columbine
Red flowers with yellow centers hang like drifts of softly illuminated lanterns in April and May. Excellent as a shady rock garden naturalizer, it also is quite content in average garden conditions. Occurs naturally in rich rocky woods, north-facing slopes, cliffs, ledges, pastures, and roadside banks. Native to all states east of the Rockies, but not found in Louisiana.
Aquilegia canadensis

Asarum canadense

Wild ginger

An attractive native groundcover for moist shade, wild ginger spreads slowly via underground rhizomes.  Lustrous dark green, kidney-shaped foliage usually obscure the unique brown jug-like flowers.  Will naturalize, incorporate into a native plant garden or woodland display.

Asarum canadense

Asclepias incarnata

Asclepias incarnata

Swamp milkweed

One of the most beautiful of native perennials with clusters of upturned pink flowers in June and July. Much underused in average garden conditions! Attracts butterflies of all kinds. Willow-like leaves are 4-5" long. Occurs in floodplains and wet meadows.

Asclepias incarnata

Asclepias syriaca

Common milkweed

This native classic is best known as a food of larval monarch butterflies (along with its siblings A. incarnata and A. tuberosa). Robust and stoloniferous with deep pink clusters of fragrant flowers in June and July, followed by lovely pods of silky seeds in October.

Asclepias syriaca

Asclepias tuberosa

Asclepias tuberosa

Butterfly weed
A tough, drought-tolerant native with intense orange flowers in mid to late summer. Attracts many varieties of butterfly and is especially attractive to Monarchs. A beautiful solution for a dry sunny slope! Occurs in dry fields and roadsides in most of the US.
Asclepias tuberosa

Asclepias verticillata

Horsetail milkweed
A widely adaptable and tough native is a deer-resistant food for larval butterflies. The fine-textured foliage provides a dark green backdrop for the clusters of white flowers that appear in June and July.
Asclepias verticillata

Aster cordifolius

Blue wood aster

Clouds of blue flowers in early fall in shade! A great naturalizer under trees, at the edge of woods, or as a filler among Hostas and Astilbes, which look pretty rough by September. Found in woods and dry meadows.

Aster cordifolius

Aster divaricatus

White wood aster

Produces a fairyland of glistening of small white daisies in September and October. Lovley naturalized in shade, average, and dry soil. Found in deciduous woods and along roadsieds of the Eastern US.

Aster divaricatus

Aster ericoides 'Snow Flurry'

Heath aster
A very low dense carpeting groundcover that is smothered with 1/2" single white flowers with gold centers in September. A good strong grower and a totally new look and use for Asters! Makes an excellent container plant.
Aster ericoides 'Snow Flurry'

Aster laevis 'Bluebird'

Aster laevis 'Bluebird'

Smooth aster
'Bluebird' is a superlative selection of the native Smooth Aster introduced by Dr. Richard Lighty of the Mt.Cuba Center. This tall vased-shaped wildflower has large 1" diameter blue flowers held in cloud-like clusters at the tips of the arching branches. You can pinch back the young shoots in June for denser habit and more flowers, but it is not essential. Staking is helpful by late summer if you forget to pinch. Perfectly clean foliage makes for easy maintenance in production and in the landscape. Aster laevis is a great source of nectar for migrating monarchs and other late season butterflies.
Aster laevis 'Bluebird'

Aster novae-angliae

New England aster
Tall and majestic, New England Aster rules the prairie in autumn. The deep blue to purple, and sometimes pink flowers are highlights of the late season wildflower garden. Blooms late into the fall, well after the first frosts. This is a critical late season nectar source for butterflies, especially for Monarchs, as they stock up for their long migration to Mexico.- Prarie Nursery
Aster novae-angliae

Aster novi-belgii

New York aster

Local midatlantic native of moist to wet meadows. Flowers may vary in shades of pink, purple and white and bloom in early fall, which is late August and early September here in PA.

Aster novi-belgii

Aster oblongifolius 'Raydon's Favorite'

Aromatic aster
Medium blue, fine textured single ray flowers in September and October,
aromatic foliage. Irresistable, a really tremendous plant. Introduced by
Holbrook Farm.
Aster oblongifolius 'Raydon's Favorite'

Aster tataricus 'Jindai'

Tatarian daisy

Large leaves (to 2') emerge in the spring and provide a bold backdrop for earlier blooming perennials. In the fall numerous flower stalks rise to 4 or 5 feet and each is covered with 1" sky blue daisy-like flowers. Flowering is later than many other asters and this species often provides brilliant color until frost. Found by Rick Darke and Skip March at the Jin Dai Botanical Garden. This cultivar is shorter than the species and less likely to require staking.

Aster tataricus 'Jindai'

Athyrium 'Branford Rambler'

Running lady fern
This is a good, frisky new fern from John Mickel of Bradford, CT. It has been billed as a running painted fern, but we have found it to be mostly green with red tones along the stem. Even so, it is a lovely and vigorous plant with delicate bright green fronds; a lively groundcover that is very easy to grow and not at all fussy; a deciduous, noninvasive creeper that fills in quickly, but doesn't take over. Hybridized by the legendary Nick Nicou, of Branford, CT.
Athyrium 'Branford Rambler'

Athyrium 'Ghost'

lady fern
From the garden of Virginia's Nancy Swell comes this stunning Lady Fern with silver-white fronds and a decidedly upright habit. Leaves age to light green with new fronds appearing throughout the season. Upright with a beautiful formal appearance that really stands out in the shady garden. This fern really prefers shade and will stand up with all fronds perpendicular to the ground in full sun.
Athyrium 'Ghost'

Athyrium angustum forma rubellum 'Lady in Red'

Lady fern
Strong-growing and dependable, the Lady Ferns are great garden plants. This selection from the New England Wildflower Society features red stems, making it a great choice to combine with purple-leaved plants. Tough and easy to grow, this sultry beauty is the right choice for perennial borders and woodlands alike. A breathtaking flush of new fronds appears in the spring, with new leaves appearing throughout the season for a continuously fresh look.
Athyrium angustum forma rubellum 'Lady in Red'

Athyrium filix-femina 'Victoriae'

Lady fern
"This is the most spectacular of all cultivars in its magnificent frond architecture. It is really the Queen of Green", according to Dr. John Mickel former curator of ferns at the New York Botanical Garden and author of "Ferns for American Gardens". As with other forms of lady ferns there is so much variability with spore production that it is necessary to produce this form in tissue culture, so its clones are identical to the parent. This superb selection has fronds whose pinnae (leaflets) crisscross to form x's and has crested pinnae tips. Another superior cultivar in the Mickel Collection ™.
Athyrium filix-femina 'Victoriae'

Athyrium filix-femina ssp. asplenioides

Lady fern
Handsome crowns of feathery fronds are typical of this genus. Delicate and lacy with arching fronds and dark red stems at maturity. Strong-growing and dependable, the Lady Ferns are great garden plants. Tough and easy to grow, this beauty is the right choice for perennial borders and woodlands alike. A breathtaking flush of new fronds appears in the spring, with new leaves appearing throughout the season for a continuously fresh look. Found in swamps, thickets and damp woods east of the Rockies.
Athyrium filix-femina ssp. asplenioides

Athyrium niponicum 'Regal Red'

Japanese painted fern
Handsome and ruffled, this high-color selection has been a much requested Japanese Painted Fern. The dark violet red interior of each 'Regal Red' frond is contrasted by bright silver edges making each leaflet distinct and creating an overall tapestry effect. The pinnules also twist a little giving the frond a "fluffed" up look. 'Regal Red' combines beautifully with red-purple Heucheras such as 'Plum Pudding' and blue sedges like Carex platyphylla or C. 'Blue Zinger'. The fronds work well in cut flower arrangements, providing lasting color and soft texture. Unique and beautiful!
Athyrium niponicum 'Regal Red'

Athyrium niponicum var. pictum

Japanese painted fern
The most colorful fern around with subtle shades of green, purple and red on a grey-blue background. The color is more intense with some direct sun, preferably morning or late afternoon. Strong-growing and dependable, the Lady Ferns are great garden plants. Native to China, Korea and Japan.
Athyrium niponicum var. pictum