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Pycnanthemum muticum (Short-toothed mountain mint)
Species Distribution Map: Click to enlarge
Map Color Key © 2013 BONAP

Pycnanthemum muticum

Short-toothed mountain mint or clustered mountain mint

We give up! So many of you claimed this mountain mint to be superior to Pycnanthemum virginianum that we decided to try it for ourselves. We love it! Its leaves are broader and more lustrous, the bracts are silvery and very showy, the flowers are pinkish and its habit is more compact. Nicely aromatic. This native is happiest at the wood's edge, so it is an excellent for a naturalized border or woodland garden. Mountain Mint is one of the best nectar sources for native butterflies, so butterfly gardeners can't do without this one. Our bees go crazy for it, too!

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Pycnanthemum muticum LP50 - 50 per flat $56.70
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Height

2-3 Feet

Spread

2 Feet

Spacing

18 Inches

Bloom Color

White

USDA Hardiness Zone 4-8

Short-toothed mountain mint Interesting Notes

No plant in the Lurie Garden is more attractive to beneficial garden insects than blunt mountain mint (Pycnanthemum muticum). In late summer this plant dances with the busy flittering of honeybees, butterflies, beneficial wasps, and moths. The flat, white flowers are accented by fuzzy blue-green bracts. This 3 ft high plant spreads out into a tidy looking, flat mound which provides a nectar-filled landing pad for pollinators... French botanist and friend of Thomas Jefferson, Andre Michaux found this plant in Pennsylvania in 1790 and named it Pycnanthemum or "densely flowered" from the Greek for dense (pyknos) and flowered (anthos). Muticum is Latin for blunt, referring to the flat bracts at the tops of each stem. Blunt mountain mint is also native to all counties in Illinois, and really doesn’t grow in the mountains, so the common name is something of a mystery. - Lurie Garden

Mountain Mint is loaded with pulegone, the same insect repellent found in pennyroyal. It can be rubbed on the skin to repel mosquitoes!

Pycnanthemum muticum Growing and Maintenance Tips

A highly competitive workhorse for extreme sites and slopes, P. muticum does well in a variety of sites from full sun to shade and dry to moist conditions. Though not overly aggressive, it will spread via rhizomes, so give it room to grow.

Key Characteristics & Attributes

Deer Resistant
Deer Resistant
Butterflies
Butterflies
Full Sun
Full Sun
Full Shade
Full Shade
Part Sun
Part Sun
Summer
Summer
Moist
Moist
Dry
Dry
Average
Average
Cut Flower
Cut Flower
Fragrant
Fragrant
Drought Tolerant
Drought Tolerant

Additional Information

Season of Interest (Flowering)
Late Summer
Soil Moisture Needs
Well-Drained
Plug Type
Landscape Plug™
Propagation Type
Vegetative
Attributes
Moist Shade
Native to North America
Erosion Control
Meadow
Moist Sun
Dry Shade